STS-100 Mission Journal

[Space News]
[Gift Shop]
[Home]

 

NASA's
Astronomy
Picture
of the Day

We are a FOSD! (That's Friend Of Space Day).

NewsFromSpace.com is a Friend Of Space Day

Embrace Space at Spaceday.com!

Watch live video on NASA TV! (Check schedule here).

Live mission audio

STS-100 Mission Journal

Note: The links below will open up in one new browser window. For best viewing, size the two web browsers so that they don't take up the entire screen - this way, you will be able to go back and forth to all the stories without losing your place.
Click the Refresh button to make sure you have the newest version.

New! Scroll right for Mission Links ------------>>>

The STS-100 crew portrait. Photo courtesy of NASA.

Shuttle Endeavour
has completed mission
STS-100 to Space Station Alpha!

Image: STS-100 Insignia.
The STS-100 mission patch shows the flags of the four nations participating in this flight.

Jump to latest STS-100 coverage

 

 

This page sponsored by:

Countdown
Creations

Shop at Countdown Creations!

Featuring Astronaut Flight Suits in all sizes!

bullet

01 May 2001 - Evening Update - Endeavour is home! NASA reports:

STS-100 Ends with California Landing
Space Shuttle Endeavour lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., May 1 at 11:11 a.m. CDT (16:11 GMT). NASA image.Space Shuttle Endeavour landed at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., ending a successful mission to the International Space Station. Endeavour touched down at 11:11 a.m. CDT (16:11 GMT). While at the station, the seven-member crew delivered and installed Canadarm2, a new-generation robotic arm supplied by the Canadian Space Agency. They also helped to transfer more than 2,721.5 kilograms (6,000 pounds) of supplies and equipment from the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and conducted two space walks. STS-100 was the ninth shuttle mission to visit the space station.
Endeavour Lands After Successful Mission to Station
NASA photo of Endeavour landing at Edwards AFBCommander Kent V. Rominger and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby brought Endeavour and her international crew to a safe landing at Edwards Air Force Base, CA, today after an 11-day, 4.9 million-mile mission to the International Space Station. Worsening weather conditions at the Kennedy Space Center, FL, forced NASA controllers to direct the Space Shuttle to California, where the weather was perfect for landing. Touchdown occurred at 12:11 p.m. EDT. Rominger, Ashby and crew members Yuri V. Lonchakov, Scott F. Parazynski, Umberto Guidoni, Chris A. Hadfield and John L. Phillips spent eight days at the International Space Station, installing the robotic Canadarm2 and delivering equipment to the orbiting outpost.

Landing video clips are available from NASA KSC and The Houston Chronicle.


bullet

01 May 2001 - Endeavour may be coming home today - but not on the first landing opportunity. NASA reports:

First Landing Attempt Waved Off
Flight controllers decided to wave off STS-100ís first landing opportunity at Kennedy Space Center due to unfavorable weather. The next opportunity available to Space Shuttle Enedeavour is at 9:39 a.m. CDT (14:39 GMT) at Kennedy. Two opportunities also exist at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. STS-100 is returning home after an eight-day visit to the International Space Station. While at the station, the STS-100 crew delivered the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, installed the stationís new robotic arm and performed two successful space walks.

The next landing opportunity at KSC comes at 10:39AM EDT (with a deorbit burn at 9:31AM EDT), but the Florida weather doesn't look like it will improve all week. The question is, will they stay up an extra day to try for KSC again, or will they just go for Edwards?  Check back for more news tonight!

 

bullet

30 April 2001 - Evening Update - Shuttle Endeavour is slated to come home tomorrow morning - weather permittingNASA reports:

STS-100 Crew Prepares for Landing
Backdropped against the blue and white Earth and sporting a readily visible new addition in the form of the Canadarm2, the International Space Station was photographed following separation from the Space Shuttle Endeavour. NASA photo.The seven-member STS-100 crew spent time Monday preparing for Tuesday's landing. Commander Kent Rominger, Pilot Jeff Ashby and Flight Engineer John Phillips verified the performance of Space Shuttle Endeavour's steering jets and flight control systems and surfaces. The rest of the crew - Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield, Yuri Lonchakov, Scott Parazynski and Umberto Guidoni - put away equipment. The crew also enjoyed some time off on Monday.
STS-100 has four landing opportunities available on Tuesday. The first opportunity is at 8:04 a.m. CDT (13:04 GMT) at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. There is a second opportunity available at Kennedy at 9:39 a.m. CDT (14:39 GMT). However, weather forecasts are not calling for acceptable weather conditions. Also, there are two opportunities available at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., at 11:11 a.m. CDT (16:11 GMT) and 12:47 p.m. CDT (17:47 GMT).
Landing Ground Tracks are available. Ask the MCC answers and Ask the Crew answers are available.
Watch NASA TV on Tuesday at 8:04 a.m. CDT (13:04 GMT) to see coverage of Space Shuttle Endeavour's landing at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. NASA TV Schedule

Landing is scheduled for tomorrow at 9:04AM EDT at Florida's KSC, but if the low clouds and rain persist, they may have to switch to a backup site in California at 12:11PM EDT - or spend an extra day in orbit.


bullet

30 April - Afternoon Update - Will the Shuttle come home tomorrow? NASA reports:

Endeavour to Make Landing Attempt Tomorrow
NASA controllers continue to study a less than optimal weather forecast and may attempt landing Space Shuttle Endeavour tomorrow morning. Weather forecasts do not look good for landing at the Kennedy Space Center, FL, however. The crew of seven is returning from a successful 11-day mission to the International Space Station. Stay tuned to weather developments and NASA controllers' decisions throughout the evening and into tomorrow morning. 

Scheduled landing time is Tuesday, May 1, at 9:04AM EDT.


bullet

30 April 2001 - The Shuttle crew is getting ready for tomorrow morning's landing. NASA reports:

Endeavour Prepares for a Tuesday Morning Landing
The STS-100 crew holds a news conference inside Space Shuttle Endeavour. On the bottom row from left to right are STS-100 Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield, Yuri Lonchakov and Umberto Guidoni. On the top row from left to right are Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski, Commander Kent Rominger, Pilot Jeff Ashby and Mission Specialist John Phillips. The white object floating in front of Lonchakov is a model of Canadarm2, which was successfully installed onto the International Space Station by the STS-100 crew. NASA image. Crewmembers are preparing Endeavour for a landing at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., at 8:04 a.m. CDT (13:04 GMT) Tuesday. Commander Kent Rominger, Pilot Jeff Ashby and Flight Engineer John Phillips will test the shuttle's steering jets and flight control surfaces today. Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield, Scott Parazynski, Umberto Guidoni and Yuri Lonchakov will stow equipment used during their stay in space.
While docked to the International Space Station the STS-100 crew accomplished all major mission objectives. Two space walks lasting 14 hours and 15 minutes, the installation of the Canadarm2 and the transfer of supplies and equipment both two and from the station were the highlights of the mission.

Meanwhile, the Soyuz spacecraft carrying Dennis Tito (the world's first space tourist) and 2 cosmonauts has docked with the ISS, and the threesome have entered the Station.

 

bullet

29 April 2001 - Evening Update - Shuttle Endeavour is heading home for a Tuesday landing. The crew took the afternoon off after today's undocking.

Flight Day Highlights videos are at The Houston Chronicle.

Watch NASA TV at 11AM EDT  tomorrow for a press conference with the orbiting crew of Endeavour.


bullet

29 April - Afternoon Update - Right on time, Shuttle Endeavour undocked from the ISS. NASA reports:

Endeavour Undocks from Station
NASA photo of STS-100 Commander Kent RomingerSTS-100 ended its eight-day stay at the International Space Station when Space Shuttle Endeavour undocked at 12:34 p.m. CDT (17:34 GMT). While at the station, the STS-100 crew conducted two space walks, installed the station's new robotic arm and transferred equipment and supplies from the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to the station. Before performing the final separation burn, STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby performed a three-quarter fly-around of the station. Endeavour is slated to land at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., at 8:03 a.m. CDT (13:03 CDT) Tuesday.

Pilot Jeff Ashby performed a fly-around of the Station after the separation burn, while cosmonaut Yuri Lonchakov filmed it with an Imax camera in the payload bay.


bullet

29 April 2001 - With Space Station Alpha's 3 Command & Control computers back on-line, and millionaire space tourist Dennis Tito on his way, the Endeavour orbiter is set to undock today. NASA reports:

Crew Set for Today's Undocking
NASA photo of STS-100 Mission Specialist Yuri Lonchakov (left) and STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby.At 12:34 p.m. CDT (17:34 GMT) Endeavour is scheduled to undock from the International Space Station. Pilot Jeff Ashby will then back the shuttle about 137 meters (450 feet) away and circle around the station three-quarters of the way for filming purposes. Finally, Ashby will fire Endeavour's thruster jets in a separation maneuver and set a course for a Tuesday morning landing at Kennedy Space Center, Florida.
After undocking, the STS-100 crewmembers will take the afternoon off. Then on Monday morning, the astronauts are scheduled for a tentative crew news conference.

Yesterday, the crews completed a tricky maneuver to return the new Station arm's pallet to Endeavour's payload bay. Separation from the Station is scheduled for 1:34PM EDT today.

 

bullet

28 April 2001 - Evening Update - The "handshake" between the Station's "Big Arm" and the Shuttle's arm 
took place
this afternoon. NASA reports:

Crew Completes Major Objectives
STS-100 Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield (left) and Scott Parazynski. The two astronauts conducted both of the mission's space walks. NASA photo.After the successful completion of the Spacelab pallet handoff, the STS-100 crew turns its attention to undocking. The successful exchange of the pallet was the last remaining major objective of the mission to be accomplished and could pave the way for Space Shuttle Endeavour to undock from the International Space Station on Sunday, if computers on board the station can be placed in a stable configuration overnight. Undocking is tentatively slated for 12:34 p.m. CDT (17:34 GMT) Sunday.
If Endeavour undocks on Sunday, Pilot Jeff Ashby is scheduled to do a three-quarter fly-around of the station before firing Endeavour's engines to begin the trip home. Also, Endeavour would be scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., at 8:04 a.m. CDT (13:04 GMT) Tuesday.
A final decision whether to undock Endeavour Ė and delay the docking of the Soyuz replacement vehicle Ė is expected tonight or early Sunday morning.
Ask the MCC answers and Ask the Crew answers are available.

With Alpha's computers are nearly all back on-line, flight controllers have tentatively decided to undock Endeavour tomorrow, which would bring the seven spacefarers home Tuesday morning. Dennis Tito and two cosmonauts are scheduled to dock with the ISS on Monday.


bullet

28 April 2001 - STS-100 work continues. NASA reports:

Joint Operations Continue for Shuttle and Station Crews
Earth's limb -- the edge of the planet seen at twilight -- was captured by a STS-100 crewmember aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. Near the center of the frame, the silhouette of cloud layers can be seen in the atmosphere, above which lies an airglow layer (left). NASA photo.The station and shuttle crews plan to handover the pallet from the station's Canadarm2 to Endeavour's robotic arm. Managers continue to evaluate the handover plan as ground controllers analyze computer problems aboard the International Space Station. In preparation for the next shuttle mission to the station, both crews are checking out the Space Vision System that helps operators align the robotic arm. Also, equipment transfer activities from the shuttle to the station continue.
Watch NASA TV for continuing coverage of STS-100. Click here for information about upcoming events.

Meanwhile, NASA and RSA have reached a compromise where the Soyuz Taxi mission launched as planned, but will delay docking if Endeavour requires more time at the ISS.

 

bullet

27 April 2001 - Evening Update - The Raffaello module is now back in Endeavour's payload bay. NASA reports:

Raffaello Returns to Cargo Bay
Space Shuttle Endeavour's robotic arm, which is being controlled by STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski, moves the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module away from the International Space Station. Raffaello was unberthed from the station about 3:03 p.m. CDT (20:03 GMT) Friday. NASA image.The STS-100 crew used Space Shuttle Endeavour's robot arm to detach the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module from the International Space Station and return it to the orbiter's payload bay. The unberthing occurred about 3:03 p.m. CDT (20:03 GMT) Friday as Endeavour and the space station flew over the northern Atlantic Ocean. STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski controlled the robot arm. He was assisted by Mission Specialist and Italian Astronaut Umberto Guidoni. Raffaello, which was built by the Italian Space Agency, is filled with trash and unneeded items and will return to Earth in Endeavour.
After a series of discussions today, NASA and the Russian IMAGE: The Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module returns to Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bayAviation and Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos) reached a decision on the launch date for the Soyuz 2 taxi mission and subsequent on-orbit activities. Rosaviakosmos will launch the Soyuz 2 as scheduled Saturday, April 28, and has agreed to delay the Soyuz's docking to the International Space Station if additional time is required to resolve command-and-control computer problems aboard the station. Meanwhile, the space station crew will continue to work their plans for bringing command-and-control computers back to full capabilities.
Space Station Robotic Arm
View a new interactive that describes the space station's robotic arm. Requires Flash Player.

bullet

27 April - Afternoon Update - Computer problems on the ISS have cleared enough to allow for the undocking of the Raffaello module. NASA reports:

Raffaello Returns to Cargo Bay
The STS-100 crew used Space Shuttle Endeavour's robot arm to detach the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module from the International Space Station and return it to the orbiter's payload bay. The unberthing occurred about 3:03 p.m. CDT (20:03 GMT) as Endeavour and the space station flew over the northern Atlantic Ocean. STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski controlled the robot arm. He was assisted by Mission Specialist and Italian Astronaut Umberto Guidoni. Raffaello, which was built by the Italian Space Agency, is filled with trash and unneeded items and will return to Earth with Endeavour.
Ask the MCC answers.

Negotiations continue with Russia for the timing of their Soyuz launch. NASA wants the rocket launch delayed to give Endeavour more time at the Station.


bullet

27 April 2001 - Recovery efforts continue for Alpha's computer systems, while Russia has yet to agree to delay their Soyuz launch to make room for Endeavour's extra day. The Russian spacecraft would have to come within 20 feet of Endeavour's tail if they were to be at the ISS at the same time. Now, children, play niceNASA reports:

Extra Day In Space Added
Mission managers added an extra day to STS-100's mission, with another extension being considered. As it stands currently, the shuttle will undock from the station on Sunday and prepare for a landing on Tuesday.
While flight controllers on Earth look into computer problems aboard the space station, the astronauts plan to close Raffaello's hatch and reberth it inside Endeavour's payload bay using the shuttle's robotic arm. Though delayed thus far, a second orbital reboost using the orbiter's thruster jets is still scheduled for the International Space Station.
Watch NASA TV at 9:46 a.m. CDT (14:46 GMT) Friday to see STS-100 Commander Kent Rominger and Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield participate in an event with Canadian Minister of Industry Brian Tobin, CSA Executive VP Marc Garneau and about 80 students ranging in age from 10-12 years.
Later in the day at 12:51 p.m. CDT (17:51 GMT), STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby, STS-100 Mission Specialist John Phillips and Expedition Two Flight Engineer Susan Helms will participate in interviews with ABC News, KNBC-TV of Los Angeles, Calif., and KOIN-TV of Portland, Ore.

Then at 2:11 p.m. CDT (19:11 GMT), the STS-100 and Expedition Two crews will hold their joint news conference. They will field questions from reporters in the United States, Canada, Italy and Russia.

Note: CDT = EDT - 1.

 

bullet

26 April 2001 - Evening Update - Well, first the computer problems were getting better... now they're getting worse! Two more computers in the ISS have gone down, prompting NASA officials to extend STS-100 by two days. Today's scheduled reboost has been pushed back, as have the undocking of the Raffaello module and the return of the Station Arm's pallet (the one it was shipped in) to the Shuttle's cargo bay. NASA reports:

STS-100 to Get Extra Time at Station
Cosmonaut and STS-100 Mission Specialist Yuri V. Lonchakov changes out a film magazine on an IMAX camera in the International Space Station's Zarya Module as Astronaut and STS-100 Mission Specialist John L. Phillips floats in the background. NASA image.Thursday afternoon, Mission Control notified the STS-100 crew that mission managers had requested that the crew get two more days of docked operations at the International Space Station. Final confirmation of the two extra days is pending Russian approval. The extended stay of Space Shuttle Endeavour would allow flight controllers more time to resolve computer problems onboard the station and to complete joint operations.
NASA image of STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby.Two major tasks remain for the STS-100 crew. One is to unberth the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module from the station and to return it to Endeavour's payload bay. Another is the handoff of the Spacelab pallet by the station's new robot arm to the shuttle's robot arm. Meanwhile, Endeavour's systems continue to operate in excellent shape.

The second extension is contingent on Russia's delaying the launch of the Soyuz rocket carrying a fresh lifeboat for the station (as well as millionaire Dennis Tito) by one day, to leave room for Endeavour to depart and avoid a too-close approach by the Russian spacecraft. The Flight Day 7 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

26 April - Afternoon Update - Computer problems continue to plague the ISS and the Endeavour shuttle docked to it. NASA reports:

Computer Glitches Clearing; Logistics Work Continues
Good news greeted space station flight controllers this morning when, shortly after awakening, Expedition Two flight engineer Susan Helms reported that the International Space Station computer systems were returning to normal. Working at a laptop computer, Helms performed a series of troubleshooting steps that restored the ground's ability to monitor and send commands to the station's U.S. systems.
Today's plan for the astronauts and cosmonauts aboard Endeavour and the station will have them continue to reload the Raffaello logistics module with unneeded station equipment and supplies for return to Earth. The crews have almost completed unloading the 4,000 pounds of equipment that Raffaello carried to the station. While that reloading work takes place, flight controllers will continue their analysis of the station computers.

It looks like the Shuttle mission may be extended for at least one day to make up for the disrupted schedule. The new Canadarm2 "handoff" has been postponed to tomorrow. Check back for more news tonight!


bullet

26 April 2001 - Overnight, Expedition Two astronaut Susan Helms reported some progress in bringing up one of the Station's Command & Control computers, which apparently are having hard drive trouble. The crews are in no danger, but this is the most serious problem the ISS has had to date. Hey, at least Mir was up for a few years before things started breaking!  NASA reports:

Joint Operations Continue for the Shuttle and Station Crews
NASA photo of Expedition Two Flight Engineer James S. Voss peers into Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 prior to hatch opening. The STS-100 and Expedition Two crews continue transferring supplies and science experiments from the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to the space station. They will also reload Raffaello with unneeded station gear and supplies. Also Endeavour's Commander Kent Rominger and Pilot Jeff Ashby are scheduled to fire the orbiter's thruster jets lifting the International Space Station to a higher orbit.
Once computer systems aboard the space station are functioning normally, Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski will operate the shuttle's robot arm as it is handed a Spacelab pallet from the station's new robotic arm.

If the computer systems are not back to normal soon, it could delay the Soyuz Taxi mission that will bring up Dennis Tito, the world's first "space tourist". At least telemetry is restored, meaning communications no longer have to be relayed though Endeavour.

 

bullet

25 April 2001 - Evening Update - A computer glitch continues to disrupt communications between the ISS and ground controllers, forcing a delay in the handoff of the new ISS arm's launch pallet to the Shuttle's arm. Ground personnel are working through the night to fix the bug, which could result in an extra day's stay for the Shuttle.  NASA reports:

Crews Unload Raffaello
STS-100 Mission Specialist Umberto Guidoni, left, and Commander Kent Rominger participate in interactive discussions with Italian President Carlo Ciampi, European Commission President Romano Prodi and European Space Agency Director-General Antonio Rodota from inside the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module on Wednesday. NASA image.As International Space Station flight controllers worked to a resolve station computer problem, the STS-100 and Expedition Two crews continued transferring supplies and science experiments from the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to the space station. Raffaello arrived at the station carrying 2.7 metric tons (3 tons) of supplies, equipment and experiment racks. The science racks are being installed into the station's U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module.
After the computer problem is resolved, STS-100 Commander Kent Rominger and Pilot Jeff Ashby are slated to fire Space Shuttle Endeavour's thrusters to raise the station's orbit. Also, Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski will operate the shuttle's robot arm as it is handed a Spacelab pallet from the station's new robotic arm.

Besides the computer problems, the ISS air purification system failed, forcing  Endeavour to scrub carbon dioxide from the air supply of both spacecraft until the Russian-built station scrubber was repaired. Talk about a rough day! The Flight Day 6 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

25 April - Afternoon Update - A problem with the computer network aboard Space Station Alpha may delay testing of the new Canadarm2NASA reports:

Space Station Reboost Delayed
Space Shuttle Endeavour flies over the Earth in this NASA image.The maneuver to raise the station's orbit has been put on hold as flight controllers evaluate a computer problem on board the station. The maneuver would have been performed by Commander Kent Rominger and Pilot Jeff Ashby. They would have raised the station another 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) by firing Endeavour's thruster jets.
Meanwhile, the STS-100 and Expedition Two crews continued to transfer equipment and supplies from the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to the station. The transfer is now running ahead of schedule.

The European Union interviewed Italian astronaut Umberto Guidoni aboard Endeavour today.


bullet

25 April 2001 - No spacewalks today, but a busy schedule is in store nonetheless. NASA reports:

Endeavour Set to Reboost Station
Shuttle Commander Kent Rominger and Pilot Jeff Ashby will spend about an hour reboosting the International Space Station another 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) by firing Endeavour's thruster jets in a precise sequence. This reboost is the second in a series of three maneuvers scheduled for the station with the third and final reboost scheduled on Thursday. Today's reboost maneuver is planned for 2:30 p.m. CDT (19:30 GMT).
Watch NASA TV at 10:11 a.m. CDT (15:11 GMT) Wednesday to see STS-100 Commander Kent Rominger and Mission Specialist Umberto Guidoni participate in interactive discussions with Italian President Carlo Ciampi, European Commission President Romano Prodi and European Space Agency Director-General Antonio Rodota. Rominger and Guidoni will participate from inside the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which was built by the Italian Space Agency.
Then at 12:51 p.m. CDT (17:51 GMT) Wednesday, Expedition Two Commander Yury Usachev and STS-100 Mission Specialist Yuri Lonchakov will field questions from Russian reporters from inside the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. NASA TV Schedule

The Italian interview is on for 11:11AM EDT, the Russian interview is on for 1:51PM EDT (we expect there will be English translation for these), and the thruster firings are scheduled for 3:30PM EDT.

 

bullet

24 April 2001 - Evening Update - Another productive day in space, featuring some zero-G electrical work... NASA reports:

Crew Completes Space Walk
NASA Image: In this view from STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield's Helmet Camera as he works outside of the Unity Module, Space Shuttle Endeavour is seen as it and the International Space Station pass over the Atlantic Ocean. Also, the side of the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module is visible in the bottom center of the image.Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski and Chris Hadfield finished up the mission's second space walk at 3:15 p.m. CDT (20:15 GMT) Tuesday. The tasks that they completed include connecting power, computer and video cables to the Power and Data Grapple Fixture on the side of the station's Destiny Laboratory, removing an antenna from the Unity Module, and disconnecting cables on the pallet that carried the new robot arm to the station. After the cables were disconnected, Expedition Two Flight Engineers Susan Helms and Jim Voss sent commands to Canadarm2 to grab the pallet and move it into a parked position. On Wednesday, Canadarm2 will hand the pallet off to the shuttle's robotic arm.
NASA image of STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott ParazynskiAt 5:15 p.m. (22:15 GMT) Tuesday, the hatches between the shuttle and the station were reopened. The two crews will spend time Wednesday unloading the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module.

The Flight Day 5 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

24 April - Afternoon Update - EVA #2 is in progressNASA reports:

Second Space Walk Under Way
STS-100 Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield (left) and Scott Parazynski suit up in preparation for today's space walk. Mission Specialist Yuri Lonchakov assists the two space walkers in the shuttle's airlock. NASA image.STS-100ís second space walk is under way. Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski began the space walk at 7:34 a.m. CDT (12:34 GMT). The objectives for the two space walkers include rewiring the base of the International Space Stationís newly installed Canadarm2, removing a communications antenna from Unity and mounting a spare electrical converter unit on a stowage platform on Destiny for future station use. The space walk is slated to last about 6 hours and 25 minutes and end around 2 p.m. CDT (19:00 GMT). Following the conclusion of the space walk, the hatches between the station and the shuttle will be reopened and joint operations with the Expedition Two crew will resume.
Watch NASA TV for continuing coverage of STS-100. Click here for information about upcoming events.

Endeavour is set to undock Saturday and land on Monday.


bullet

24 April 2001 - The second spacewalk of the mission begins today. NASA reports:

STS-100 Crew Set for Space Walking and Unpacking
NASA preflight photo of STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski.Space walkers Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski are set to connect cables to the Power and Data Grapple Fixture on the side of the stationís Destiny laboratory. They will also disconnect cables from the Spacelab Pallet, as well as remove an antenna from the Unity Module during a planned 6.5-hour space walk starting about 8 a.m. CDT (13:00 GMT) today.
After the space walk is complete, the hatches between the shuttle and station will reopen so both crews can begin unloading the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. European Space Agency astronaut Umberto Guidoni will lead and assist station crewmembers as they off-load two new experiment racks then reload discarded items back into Raffaello for return to Earth.

The EVA starts around 9AM EDT, and will involve electrical work on the Station's new "Big Arm".

 

bullet

23 April 2001 - Evening Update - Working together, the crews of Shuttle Endeavour and Space Station Alpha installed the new Canadarm2 manipulator arm, and docked the re-usable Raffaello module to the Station. NASA reports:

STS-100 Crew Completes Busy Day; Space Walk Slated for Tuesday
From left to right, STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield, Pilot Jeff Ashby and Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski participate in interviews with CNN, CBS News and Fox News from inside the International Space Station. The white object in front of Parazynski is a model space shuttle. NASA image.The STS-100 crew had a busy day on Monday and has another on tap for Tuesday with the mission's second space walk. Monday's activities began when the six astronauts and one cosmonaut entered the International Space Station and met the Expedition Two crew at 4:25 a.m. CDT (9:25 GMT). Later in the day, Pilot Jeff Ashby used Space Shuttle Endeavour's robotic arm to install the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module onto the space station. Also, Commander Kent Rominger and Ashby fired the shuttle's jets to raise the space station's altitude 4 kilometers (2.5 statute miles).
NASA image of STS-100 Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield (left) and Scott ParazynskiThe hatches between the two spacecraft closed at 2:26 p.m. CDT (19:26 GMT) in preparation for Tuesday's space walk. Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski and Chris Hadfield are slated to begin the space walk at 8:06 a.m. CDT (13:06 GMT). Among their tasks is the rewiring of the base of the station's newly installed robotic arm.

Watch the second EVA tomorrow, shortly after 9AM EDT. The Flight Day 4 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

23 April - Afternoon Update - The STS-100 crew and the Expedition Two crew have been working jointly to assemble the Station's robotic arm, and attach the Raffaello module (a reusable cargo carrier like STS-102's Leonardo). Endeavour will remain docked to the Station until Sunday. NASA reports:

Crew Attaches Raffaello to Station
STS-100 Mission Specialist Yuri V. Lonchakov, waves to a crewmate as he passes through the passageway between Space Shuttle Endeavour's mid deck and flight deck. NASA photo.The second reusable cargo carrier built by the Italian Space Agency was attached to the International Space Station. Installation occurred at 12:05 p.m. CDT (17:05 GMT). STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby used Space Shuttle Endeavourís robot arm to lift Raffaello out of the orbiterís payload bay and attach it to the stationís Unity Module. Raffaello contains supplies and science racks for the space station. It will be unloaded and, later, reloaded with trash and equipment returning to Earth on Endeavour. Raffaello is scheduled to be detached from the station and returned to the payload bay on Friday.
Raffaello attached to the International Space Station.Also, the STS-100 crew entered the space station and met the Expedition Two crew for the first time at 4:25 a.m. CDT (9:25 GMT) today. The two crews are participating in joint operations. The hatches between the two spacecraft will close this afternoon in order to prepare for Tuesdayís space walk by Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski.

Italian astronaut Umberto Guidoni received a special message from The Vatican today. Pope John Paul II sent blessings to the entire crew. Hey, we need all the help we can get!


bullet

23 April 2001 - Now that yesterday's successful EVA is over, the hatches between Endeavour and ISS have opened, and the 10 crewmembers are togetherNASA reports:

Shuttle and Station Crews Meet
The STS-100 and Expedition Two crews greet each other for the first time Monday morning inside the U.S. Destiny Laboratory. NASA image.At 4:25 a.m. CDT (9:25 GMT) today, the Expedition Two crew welcomed the seven STS-100 crewmembers onboard the International Space Station. The meeting marks the start of joint operations between the two crews. Later today, STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby will use Space Shuttle Endeavourís robotic arm to lift the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module out of the payload bay and attach it to the International Space Stationís Unity Module. Raffaello, a reusable cargo module supplied by the Italian Space Agency, contains supplies and science racks for the stationís U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. The hatches between the two spacecraft will be closed this afternoon in preparation for Tuesday's space walk, but will reopen Tuesday afternoon following the completion of the space walk.

The two spacecraft have been docked since Saturday morning.

 

bullet

22 April 2001 - Evening Update - Endeavour's flight continues. Today's seven-hour EVA hit a minor snag when astronaut Chris Hadfield reported some eye irritation while assembling the Station's robotic arm. The Canadian spacewalker was able to work through it. Tomorrow, the crews will meet, and the Raffaello module will be docked to the Station. NASA reports:

STS-100 Crew Completes First Space Walk
NASA image of STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski Watch NASA TV on Monday to see continuing coverage of STS-100. The Expedition Two and STS-100 crews are scheduled to meet each other for the first time at 4:01 a.m. CDT (9:01 GMT).
At 5:26 a.m. CDT (10:26 GMT), the International Space Station's new robotic arm, Canadarm2, is slated to begin the walkoff of its pallet.
The installation of the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module on the International Space Station is slated for 10:11 a.m. CDT (15:11 GMT). Then at 12:06 p.m. CDT (17:06 GMT), the STS-100 crew will participate in interviews with CNN, CBS News and Fox News. NASA TV Schedule

The Flight Day 3 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

22 April - Afternoon Update - The mission's first EVA is completeNASA reports:

Crew Wraps Up First Space Walk
STS-100 Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield (left) and Scott Parazynski install an ultra high frequency antenna onto the International Space Station on Sunday during the mission's first space walk. NASA image.STS-100 Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski and Chris Hadfield successfully completed the mission's first space walk at 1:55 p.m. CDT (18:55 GMT) Sunday. With the assistance of shuttle robot arm operator Jeff Ashby and space walk coordinator John Phillips, they installed an ultra high frequency antenna and the new robotic arm - the Space Station Remote Manipulator System - onto the International Space Station. The station's robotic arm, which is also known as Canadarm2, will walk off its pallet to a grapple fixture on the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module on Monday. The space walk lasted 7 hours and 10 minutes. The mission's second space walk is slated for Tuesday.

The Flight Day 2 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

22 April 2001 - The first spacewalk of the mission is in progressNASA reports:

First Space Walk Begins
The shuttle's robotic arm guides a pallet containing a new robotic arm, or Canadarm2, towards the International Space Station. NASA image. STS-100 Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski began the missionís first space walk at 6:45 a.m. CDT (11:45 GMT). The main objectives of the space walk are the installation of Canadarm2 - a robotic arm - and an ultra high frequency, or UHF, antenna on the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Endeavour robot arm operator Jeff Ashby and space walk choreographer John Phillips will assist Parazynski and Hadfield.
The shuttle's robotic arm rests in front of Raffaello, the Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, after latching a pallet containing the station's new robotic arm to the Destiny Laboratory Module. NASA image.Prior to the start of the space walk, Ashby used the shuttle arm to lift the pallet containing the Canadarm2, which is also known as the Space Station Remote Manipulator System, out of Endeavourís payload bay. Then he attached the pallet to the stationís U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. The space walk is slated to end at 1:15 p.m. CDT (18:15 GMT).
The planned 6.5 hour space walk will be the 19th in support of space station assembly and the 63rd in space shuttle history. Ask the MCC answers.

 

bullet

21 April 2001 - Evening Update - Docked operations continue. NASA reports:

STS-100 Docks with Station; Crew Prepares for Space Walk
Space Shuttle Endeavour launches from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., to begin STS-100 on April 19 at 1:41 p.m. CDT (18:41 GMT). NASA image.Space Shuttle Endeavour successfully docked with the International Space Station at 8:59 a.m. CDT (13:59 GMT) Saturday. Docking occurred as the two spacecraft were flying over the southern Pacific Ocean, southeast of New Zealand. After docking, the STS-100 crew popped the hatch between the shuttle and the station's docking port to leave supplies for the Expedition Two crew. The two crews will meet face to face for the first time on Monday.
STS-100 Commander Kent Rominger. NASA image.The STS-100 crew also continued preparations for the mission's first space walk. It will be conducted by Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski and Chris Hadfield. The primary goals are to install the station's new robotic arm and a communications antenna onto the station. The space walk is slated to begin at about 6:20 a.m. (11:20 GMT) Monday.

The Flight Day 1 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

21 April - Afternoon Update - Docked operations are underway, as supplies are being transferred via the Station's airlock. The first EVA is scheduled for tomorrow at 7:21AM EDT. NASA reports:

At Least Two Space Walks on Tap for STS-100 Crew
Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield knocks on the hatch window between Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 and the U.S. Destiny Laboratory as the rest of the STS-100 crew looks on. This image was taken by the Expedition Two crew from inside the International Space Station. The two crews will not meet face to face until Monday. NASA image.The STS-100 crew will perform at least two space walks during its stay at the International Space Station. The primary objectives of the space walks are to install and activate the station's new robotic arm - the Space Station Remote Manipulator System - and to install an Ultra High Frequency communications antenna onto the space station. Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski will perform the space walks. If needed, a third space walk will be conducted.
Watch NASA TV on Sunday to see coverage of STS-100ís first space walk to install the new Canadarm2 robotic arm. The 6.5-hour space walk is scheduled to begin at 6:21 a.m. CDT (11:21 GMT). NASA TV Schedule

This morning's docking happened about 20 minutes later than planned.


bullet

21 April 2001 - The Space Shuttle is now docked with the ISS!  NASA reports:

Endeavour Docks with Station
NASA image of the Space Shuttle docking to the International Space Station.Space Shuttle Endeavour docked with the International Space Station today at 8:59 a.m. CDT (13:59 GMT), making STS-100 the ninth shuttle mission to visit the orbital outpost. Later, the seven-member STS-100 crew opened the hatch to the stationís docking port and began transferring supplies. The two crews will not meet face to face until Monday. The space shuttle crew will also turn its attention to Sundayís space walk that will be conducted by Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski. It will be the first of two scheduled space walks to install and activate the stationís new robotic arm. Sundayís space walk is slated to begin at 6:21 a.m. CDT (11:21 GMT).

Docking occurred at 9:59AM EDT today.

 

bullet

20 April 2001 - Evening Update - Shuttle Endeavour will dock with Space Station Alpha tomorrow. The orbiter is closing in on the ISS after yesterday's launchNASA reports:

STS-100 Crew Prepares For Docking
The day on orbit was one of preparations as Endeavourís seven astronauts got ready for tomorrow morningís scheduled arrival at the International Space Station, and Sundayís planned space walk by Mission Specialists Chris Hadfield and Scott Parazynski.
Endeavour is scheduled to dock with the station at [9:32AM EDT] Saturday although the crews will not greet each other until early Monday.

The Flight Day 1 Crew Activity Report is now available at The Houston Chronicle.


bullet

20 April 2001 - Endeavour's crew began their first full day on orbit today, preparing for tomorrow's docking with the ISSNASA reports:

Crew Prepares For Saturday's Docking to the Station
The shuttle crew will spend the day preparing for Saturday's docking to the International Space Station. Several rendezvous maneuvers are scheduled today, while the crew will check out three space suits and the Canadian-built robotic arm. The astronauts will also check out the shuttle's docking system and the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module supplied by the Italian Space Agency. The two space walks planned for this mission will be devoted to the installation and support of the robotic arm, also known as Canadarm2.

 

bullet

19 April 2001 - Evening Update - The crew of Shuttle Endeavour is in orbit, racing towards a rendezvous with the ISS. NASA reports:

Endeavour Reaches for Space Station
Space Shuttle Endeavour launch. NASA image.
The Space Shuttle Endeavour headed for its rendezvous with the International Space Station at 2:41 pm EDT today, the ninth shuttle flight to visit the station. Endeavour and her seven-member crew will deliver the station's Canadian-made robotic arm, the Italian-made Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with cargo and a UHF antenna. Raffaello contains six system racks and two storage racks for the station's Destiny Laboratory Module. The crew is comprised of American, Russian, Italian and Canadian spacefarers.
Watch NASA TV on Friday at 1:41 p.m. CDT (18:41 GMT) when the STS-100 crew participates in interviews with KUSA-TV, KMGH-TV and KCNC-TV of Denver, Colo. NASA TV Schedule

KSC was chock-full of Canadians, there to see off Chris Hadfield, who will become the first spacewalker from the Great White North - and who will help install CanadArm 2, a larger and more mobile version of the robotic arm on the Shuttle. Lift off, eh?


bullet

19 April - Afternoon Update - LIFTOFF! STS-100 is underwayNASA reports:

Endeavour Lifts Off to Begin STS-100
Space Shuttle Endeavour's solid rocket boosters separate from the external tank after launching from Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Endeavour launched Thursday at 1:41 p.m. CDT (18:41 GMT) to begin STS-100. NASA image.Space Shuttle Endeavour launched from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., today to begin STS-100, the ninth space shuttle mission in the International Space Station assembly sequence. Liftoff occurred at 1:41 p.m. CDT (18:41 GMT). Endeavour and its seven-member crew will deliver a new-generation robot arm and the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to the station. Endeavour is slated to dock with the station Saturday at 8:36 a.m. CDT (13:36 GMT).

Quick Links:
ABC: Liftoff!
Washington Post: Endeavour Blasts Off
Discovery: Shuttle Takes off for Space Station
BBC: Endeavour lifts off with space crane
Denver Post: Shuttle mission has Colorado cast
Orlando Sentinel: Shuttle's cargo- A long arm
CBS: Right On Time
UPI: Endeavour launches on high-tech mission


bullet

19 April - Morning Update - Endeavour is ready to go! NASA reports:

External Tank Fueling Complete
Launch day has arrived for STS-100. Workers fueled up Space Shuttle Endeavourís external tank this morning. Endeavour is slated to lift off today at 1:41 p.m. CDT (18:41 GMT). Endeavour and its seven-member crew will deliver a new-generation robotic arm and the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to the International Space Station. If Endeavour lifts off at the preferred launch time, the station will be flying south of the southern coast of India over the Indian Ocean near the Maldive Islands. This will place it at 00.02 degrees south latitude and 74.57 degrees east longitude.

Preflight videos are available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

19 April 2001 - Shuttle Endeavour will lift off this afternoon on a mission to bring supplies to the ISS, and install a next-generation robotic arm onto the Station. The 7-man crew features, among others, the first European astronaut to visit the station, and the first Canadian spacewalker. STS-100 is flying the second of 3 reusable cargo carriers (MPLMs) built by the Italian Space AgencyNASA reports:

Space Shuttle Set to Launch to Station Today
Preparations are on schedule at the Kennedy Space Center, FL, for launch of space shuttle mission STS-100 to the International Space Station at 2:41 pm EDT today. This will be the ninth shuttle flight to visit the station. Forecasts predict a good chance of favorable weather for launch.
Watch NASA TV to see launch coverage for STS-100. Coverage begins Thursday at 8 a.m. CDT (13:00 GMT). Space Shuttle Endeavour and its seven-member crew are slated to launch 1:41 p.m. CDT (18:41 GMT). Then at about 2:45 p.m. CDT (19:45 GMT), the post-launch news conference is scheduled to take place. NASA TV Schedule

Note: Houston reports time as CDT (Central Daylight Time), while KSC reports in EDT (Eastern). Launch is scheduled for 2:40PM EDT on Thursday (today). Watch live on NASA TV.  CNN and the European Space Agency will also be webcasting the launch.

 

bullet

18 April 2001 - Evening Update - Final preparations are being made for Endeavour's launch tomorrowNASA reports:

Shuttle Mission to Launch Tomorrow With a New Arm
NASA artist's view of Candarm2 at the space station.
When the space shuttle Endeavour blasts off on mission STS-100, tomorrow afternoon, one of its passengers will be a new assistant for the crew of the International Space Station -- an extraordinary robotic arm called Canadarm2, that will be essential for building and maintaining the station. This Canadian Space Agency contribution to the station is big and strong and has some amazing tricks up its sleeve. Each end of the new arm has a hand that can grasp an anchor on the space station. By flipping end-over-end between anchor points, Canadarm2 can move around the ISS like an inchworm. Astronauts will install Canadarm2 during a series of spacewalks beginning on mission day 4. Launch of STS-100 is scheduled for 2:41 p.m. EDT tomorrow, April 19.

Will solar flares delay Sunday's EVA?


bullet

18 April 2001 - The countdown continues for tomorrow's launch. NASA reports:

Launch Countdown Continues
Space Shuttle Endeavour sits on Launch Pad 39A as preparations continue for the liftoff of STS-100. NASA photo. STS-100 launch countdown activities continue at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Lift off is set for 1:41 p.m. CDT (18:41 GMT) Thursday. STS-100 will deliver a new-generation robotic arm to the International Space Station. The Rotating Service Structure is slated to be drawn back from the pad at 5:30 p.m. CDT (22:30 GMT) today, the fueling of Endeavour's external tank could begin as early as 4:15 a.m. CDT (09:15 GMT) Thursday. Forecasts still predict a 90-percent chance of favorable weather Thursday for launch.
If Endeavour lifts off at the preferred launch time, the station will be flying south of the southern coast of India over the Indian Ocean near the Maldive Islands. This will place it at 00.02 degrees south latitude and 74.57 degrees east longitude.

Endeavour is scheduled to lift off tomorrow (Thursday) at 2:40PM EDT. A last-minute electrical repair went well today.

 

bullet

28 March 2001 - Endeavour will be visiting the ISS next month. NASA reports:

Preparations Under Way for STS-100
The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello rests in its workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) as an Alenia Aerospazio worker passes by. NASA photo.At Launch Pad 39A, preparations are under way for the launch of STS-100, which is slated for April 19 at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Space Shuttle Endeavour and its seven-member crew will deliver the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and a robotic arm to the International Space Station. The STS-100 crew is scheduled to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test on March 29 and 30. The flight readiness review is slated for April 5.

Pre-flight images are available in the NASA Gallery.

 

bullet

26 March 2001 - Welcome to our coverage of Space Shuttle flight STS-100. Here's the mission profile from NASA:

Space Shuttle Endeavour to Deliver Space Station Remote Manipulator System
Endeavour on its way to the launchpad. NASA photo.STS-100 will be the ninth space shuttle flight to visit the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Endeavour and its seven-member crew will deliver the stationís robotic arm, the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and a UHF antenna. Raffaello contains six system racks and two storage racks for the stationís U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. The crew will conduct at least two space walks to install the robot arm, which is also known as the Space Station Remote Manipulator System, and the antenna.

Orbiter processing for Endeavour began in December 2000.

 

[Top]   [Space Home]   [Latest News]   [Missions]   [Gift Shop]   [Photos]   [Search]

           

STS-100 Links...

______


 

Play-By-Play:

Spaceflight
Now!


 

Florida
Today


 

______


 

SpaceRef
Mission
Guide


 

______


 

NASA STS-100 Photo Galleries:

Johnson
Space
Center


 

Kennedy
Space
Center


 

KSC Photo
File


 

______


 

Shuttle
Press Kit


 

______


 

Yahoo!
News

 

______


 

Houston
Chronicle


 

______


 

Canadian
Space
Agency


 

______


 

Space.com


 

______


 

Live video on NASA TV! (Check schedule here).

Live mission audio

 

______

 

Space Day 2001

This page sponsored by:

Countdown
Creations

Shop at Countdown Creations!

Featuring Astronaut Flight Suits in all sizes!

 



Blast off to the ISS Journal!

 

______

 

NASA
Space
Station
Robotic Arm






Space Day 2001