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ISS crewmwmbers Gidzenko, Krikalev and Shepherd at a pre-launch press conference at Baikonur complex in Kazakhstan. Photo courtesy of NASA.

First permanent Space Station Crew!

ISS Expedition One crew patch, showing the names of Gidzenko and Krikalev in Cyrillic letters, and Shepherd's name in Roman letters. Image courtesy of NASA.


New - Discovery is bringing the Expedition One crew home - follow the flight at the
STS-102 Mission Journal page!
Other Shuttle visits are detailed at the new Missions page!


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19 March 2001 - Discovery has undocked from the Space Station, marking the official end of Expedition One to the ISS. NASA reports:

Expedition Two Takes Command of Station
Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd, on the right, gives the International Space Station's log book to Expedition Two Commander Yury Usachev during a change of command ceremony. NASA image.Expedition Two's Yury Usachev relieved Expedition One's Bill Shepherd as commander of the International Space Station in a brief change of command ceremony onboard the station. The Expedition One crew's - Shepherd, Pilot Yuri Gidzenko and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev - tour of duty onboard the station officially ended when the hatches closed between the station and shuttle for the final time at 8:32 p.m. CST (02:32 GMT Monday). Expedition Two - Usachev and Flight Engineers Jim Voss and Susan Helms - will spend four months on the station. Discovery undocked at 10:32 p.m. CST Sunday (04:32 GMT Monday).

Now the STS-102 astronauts (with their three new crewmembers) turn their thoughts towards home, with a return to Earth scheduled for late Tuesday night/Wednesday morning. They also commented on the impending demise of Russia's Mir station - where four of the ten people in orbit right now have served. NASA TV interview tonight - check here for details.

 

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18 March 2001 - We have some updating to do on this page (stay tuned)! For now, Expedition One is drawing to a close, with the three-man crew anxious to get home. Their tour ends tonight with the undocking of Shuttle Discovery (STS-102). NASA reports:

Station Prepares to Change Expeditions, Commanders
Even though Expedition One’s stay at the International Space Station does not officially end until Space Shuttle Discovery undocks, there will be a short change of command ceremony just before final hatch closure. In the ceremony, Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd will handover command of the station to Expedition Two Commander Yury Usachev. Discovery’s departure also will mark the end of a successful tour of duty on the station by the Expedition One crew and the beginning of a busy four-month stay for the Expedition Two crew. Hatch closure is slated for 7:27 p.m. CST today (01:27 GMT Monday), and undocking is scheduled for 10:32 p.m. CST today (04:32 GMT Monday).
Expedition One Nearing Completion
Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd, Pilot Yuri Gidzenko and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev began the permanent human habitation of the International Space Station on Nov. 2, 2000. During their stay, which will end when Space Shuttle Discovery undocks from the station on March 17, the station continued to grow in size with the installation of the large U.S. solar array structure on STS-97 and the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module on STS-98. Much of the crew's work was centered on preparing the inside of the station for future crews. Shepherd, Gidzenko and Krikalev are slated to return to Earth on STS-102, which is scheduled to land March 20 at 11:55 p.m. CST (March 21 at 05:55 GMT).

Follow the transition to Expedition Two at the STS-102 Mission Journal.

 

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01 February 2001 - Atlantis will arrive at the ISS in about a week. NASA reports:

Crew Prepares for Destiny's Arrival
Astronaut Bill Shepherd and Cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev continue to prepare for the arrival of STS-98. Space Shuttle Atlantis and its five-member crew will continue the on-orbit construction of the station with the delivery and installation of the U.S. Laboratory Module Destiny. The station crew and flight controllers plan to conduct a rehearsal of Atlantis' docking with the orbital outpost. Also, they will conduct an experiment to measure electrical charging by the U.S. solar arrays. Atlantis is slated to lift off from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Feb. 7 at 5:11 p.m. CST (23:11 GMT) and dock with the station Feb. 9 at 10:56 a.m. CST (16:56 GMT).

Businessman Dennis Tito has signed a new contract for a Russian launch to the ISS, now that his planned Mir trip is on the rocks.

 

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28 January 2001 - The Space Station crew paused to reflect on the 15th anniversary of the Challenger disaster. NASA reports:

In Remembrance of the Space Shuttle Challenger Crew
The Expedition One crew sent a message to Earth in remembrance of the members of the STS-51L crew who died in an accident on Space Shuttle Challenger on Jan. 28, 1986.
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25 January 2001 - Still waiting...  NASA reports:

Space Station Waits for Destiny
As the International Space Station continued to orbit the Earth in excellent shape, its three-member crew spent a smooth week performing routine maintenance and inspections, practicing emergency procedures and preparing for the arrival of the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. The emergency procedures that were practiced included dealing with a simulated leak and making preparations for the evacuation of the space station. Also, the crew performed several housekeeping jobs and exercised daily.
Destiny is scheduled to be delivered to the station by STS-98 on Feb. 9. Space Shuttle Atlantis and the STS-98 crew are slated to liftoff from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Feb. 7 at 5:11 p.m. CST (23:11 GMT). The STS-98 Press Kit is available.
Expedition One on-orbit imagery is available in the Gallery. Also, check out the new Expedition One crew videos.

 

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18 January 2001 - Atlantis' launch is delayed for safety concerns! NASA reports:

Crew Continues to Prepare for Destiny's Arrival
The Expedition One crew from left to right: Soyuz Commander Yuri Gidzenko, Station Commander Bill Shepherd and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev. NASA photo. Even though the launch of STS-98 is delayed by three weeks, the Expedition 1 crew will continue preparation for the arrival of Space Shuttle Atlantis and the U.S. Laboratory Module Destiny. As the crewmembers await Atlantis' arrival, they will be conducting inventory and stowing items, reviewing documents for the activation of Destiny, practicing for an emergency departure from the station, and taking part in conferences with technical specialists. Over the past week, they reinstated the use of the Zvezda Service Module's eight batteries with the replacement of a faulty current converter. Also, they removed an air duct that was obstructing one of four latches inside of the docking port. The latches were cycled and the docking port is ready for relocation during STS-98. Meanwhile, the station continues to orbit the Earth in excellent shape.
Watch NASA TV on Thursday, Jan. 18 to see the Expedition 1 Mission Status Briefing, which is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. CST (21:00 GMT).

The new liftoff date is tentatively scheduled for early February, pending inspection of the electrical cabling that controls SRB separation. 

 

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11 January 2001 - The crew of Space Station Alpha is getting ready to play host to their second of three visiting Shuttle flights. NASA reports:

Crew Prepares for Destiny's Arrival
Onboard the International Space Station, Astronaut Bill Shepherd and Cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko are preparing for the arrival of STS-98. Space Shuttle Atlantis and its five-member crew will deliver and install the U.S. Laboratory Module Destiny, the station's first science facility. The station crew conducted inventory and began stowing equipment and supplies.
In addition to the installation of Destiny, the STS-98 astronauts will relocate a docking port and conduct three space walks. Atlantis is slated to launch Jan. 19 at 1:11 a.m. CST (07:11 GMT) and dock with the station Jan. 20 at 7:45 p.m. CST (Jan. 21 at 01:45 GMT). The STS-98 Press Kit is available.

Follow the Shuttle flight on our new STS-98 Mission Journal.

 

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03 January 2001 - It's now 10 weeks since the two Russians and one American made a home on Space Station Alpha. NASA reports:

Crew Enters 10th Week in Orbit
As preparations on Earth stepped up for STS-98, which will deliver the U.S. Destiny Laboratory to the International Space Station, the three-member Expedition 1 crew entered its 10th week in orbit on Wednesday, Jan. 3. The crew reported that everything onboard the station is running smoothly. Recent activities for the crew include conducting biomedical and engineering experiments, performing systems maintenance and exercising. Later this week, the crew will review flight plans for the arrival of STS-98.

Shuttle Atlantis is due to launch on Jan 19th, to deliver the Station's newest module, the "Destiny" lab. Follow the flight on our new STS-98 Mission Journal.

 

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02 January 2001 - The trio of space explorers aboard the ISS celebrated a quiet New Year in orbit. NASA reports:

Station Crew Welcomes New Year
In their tenth week aboard, Astronaut Bill Shepherd and Cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev became the first crew to experience the beginning of a new year on the International Space Station. The crew members spent a relaxing New Year's Eve holding private conferences with their families as they geared up for a busy week of biomedical experiments and preparations for the next Shuttle assembly flight to the ISS which is scheduled for launch the third week in January. They also paused to send a goodwill message to Earth. It is Naval tradition for the person on duty at the helm of a ship to provide an entry into the ship's log at the turn of the New Year. Shepherd, a U.S. Navy captain, wrote a poem to capture his thoughts and reflections on the occasion. (Full Story)
STS-97 post-flight imagery and Expedition 1 on-orbit imagery is available in the Gallery. Also, check out the new Expedition 1 crew videos.

 

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30 December 2000 - How do you ring in the New Year when you orbit the Earth 15 times a day? Check out how the crew of Space Station Alpha plan to celebrate New Year's Eve.

Read about one physicist's experiment to find antimatter and "dark matter" in the universe - (and the seven-ton instrument that will be added to the ISS).

 

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29 December 2000 - Dennis Tito, the former rocket scientist (and current wealthy investor) has made his final payment to the account holding his money aside to fund a trip to space. Originally planned for Mir, this historic trip (world's first space tourist) is slated to visit the International Space Station. Tito is scheduled to blast off sometime this spring aboard a Soyuz rocket. NASA has no comment about it. Wonder if he'll be confined to the Russian modules?

 

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27 December 2000 - The Progress re-supply ship that had undocked from ISS to make room for Shuttle Endeavour is now re-connected to the Station. NASA reports:

Progress Cargo Vehicle Redocked with International Space Station
The International Space Station as seen from Progress prior to redocking. Image courtesy of NASA. More than three weeks after it was undocked and placed in a parking orbit, an unmanned Russian Progress resupply vehicle was manually redocked to the International Space Station Dec. 26 at 5:03 a.m. CST (11:03 GMT). The Progress will be used as a trash receptacle and a fuel farm by the Expedition 1 crew.

 

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26 December 2000 - Here is Part 2 of the CNN series on the year 2001, "The Science of the International Space Station".

 

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23 December 2000 - Christmas is coming - and the ISS crew's thoughts are probably of home and family. Life in space is not easy! NASA reports:

Crew Sends Holiday Greetings
Onboard the International Space Station, Expedition 1 Commander Bill Shepherd, Soyuz Commander Yuri Gidzenko and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev sent holiday greetings to the people of Earth.
On Christmas Day, the crewmembers will take a break from their work activities and have a quiet celebration. They will open gifts that were delivered by a cargo ship and Space Shuttle Endeavour, talk to their families and eat rehydrated turkey.
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20 December 2000 - Latest ISS Status Report here.

 

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15 December 2000 - CNN.COM readers chat with the Space Station crew - see it here.

 

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14 December 2000 - Latest ISS Status Report here.

 

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09 December 2000 - Frustration At The Station: The ISS may be an engineering marvel, but life inside is difficult, and things can get tense with ground controllers.

 

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06 December 2000 - The Endeavour astronauts face a tricky repair job on the first solar panel, which was deployed Sunday. It's busy inside the Station as well. NASA reports:

Crew Works in Unity, Zvezda
Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd and cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko had a busy day Wednesday aboard the space station. They installed a new air conditioning unit brought up by the Progress supply vessel which docked with the station Nov. 17 to replace one that had failed earlier in the week. The new unit is functioning well. The crew also replaced a malfunctioning fan in the Vozdukh carbon dioxide removal unit, bringing that life-support unit back on line.
Shepherd went back inside the Unity module about 4:30 a.m. Wednesday to install electrical outlets and air ducts and separate the power feeds going to the early communication and S-band communication systems, providing additional redundancy.
Far-Out Housekeeping on the Space Station
Photo of spacewalking astronaut courtesy of NASA.We focus on the daring accomplishments of our astronauts on the International Space Station and the Space Shuttle. But in space as at home, somebody still has to cook dinner and take out the trash. Learn about the day-to-day routine of life in orbit from two veteran astronauts who helped build the space station. Meanwhile, the five Endeavour astronauts currently visiting the space station are preparing for the third space walk of the mission, scheduled to begin Thursday at 11:51 a.m. EST. Follow the space walk live on NASA TV or NASA TV on the Web. In addition to installing a probe on the International Space Station to measure the electrical potential of plasma, space walkers Joe Tanner and Carlos Noriega will adjust tension on the solar blankets of the starboard solar array that was deployed Sunday night.

More info at the STS-97 Mission Journal page.

 

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03 December 2000 - Shuttle Endeavour continues docked operations with the ISS today. NASA reports:

Station Crew Enters Unity, Gets Items Left by STS-97 Astronauts
The International Space Station waits on Space Shuttle Endeavour on Saturday, Dec. 2, in this photo taken by a camera on Endeavour. Image courtesy of NASA. This morning, Expedition 1 Commander Bill Shepherd expressed happiness about the supplies and care packages that the STS-97 crew left in the docking port. Among the supplies left in the port were a new laptop computer and headsets, water, food, coffee and a pair of pliers. Shepherd said, "It's kind of like Christmas up here going through the bags."
Sunday, the P6 Integrated Truss Structure, which contains the U.S. solar arrays, will be attached by Endeavour's robotic arm and STS-97 space walkers Joe Tanner and Carlos Noriega. While at the station, the STS-97 crew will conduct a total of three space walks. Friday, the STS-97 astronauts will meet the station crew for the first time.
Expedition 1 on-orbit imagery is available in the Gallery. Also, check out the new Expedition 1 crew videos.

Get the scoop at the STS-97 Mission Journal page!

 

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02 December 2000 - Shuttle Endeavour (STS-97) docked with the ISS today! NASA reports:

Endeavour Docks with Station
Endeavour's astronauts executed a flawless docking to the inhabited International Space Station at 2 p.m. [3PM EST] Saturday and took the first step in providing additional power to the orbiting complex in preparation for the first of three planned space walks Sunday.
With Expedition One crew members Bill Shepherd, Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev looking on, Commander Brent Jett guided the shuttle to a smooth linkup with the ISS as the two craft sailed 230 statute miles above northeast Kazakhstan. Endeavour is attached to a new station docking port installed last month by the STS-92 astronauts.
STS-97 Arrives at Space Station to Install, Deploy Solar Arrays
This is an image of the International Space Station as seen through the shuttle docking mechanism. The object in the middle of the picture is Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 on the station's Unity Connecting Module. Image courtesy of NASA.
STS-97's work will increase the power generating capability of the station with the installation of the P6 Integrated Truss Structure, which contains the first set of U.S. solar arrays. The shuttle astronauts were assisted in the docking by Expedition 1 crew on the International Space Station.
Sunday, the P6 will be attached by Endeavour's robotic arm and STS-97 space walkers Joe Tanner and Carlos Noriega. When the solar arrays are deployed, the station will become the third brightest object in the night sky. While at the station, the STS-97 crew will conduct a total of three space walks. Friday, the STS-97 astronauts will meet the station crew for the first time.

Follow the action at the STS-97 Mission Journal page!

 

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30 November 2000 - Latest ISS Status Report here.

 

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27 November 2000 - If Russia downs their Mir space station, what will happen to their commitment to Dennis Tito, the millionaire former rocket scientist who was promised a trip up there? Will they send him to Alpha instead? More at the News Page...

 

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26 November 2000 - How do you keep microscopic stowaways off the ISS (AKA Space Station Alpha)? Read all about it here.

 

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24 November 2000 - The multinational crew of Space Station Alpha paused to send Thanksgiving wishes to ground controllers yesterday. No day off for the guys, though - they are still unpacking supplies sent up on the Progress cargo ship, and getting ready to greet Endeavour next month. Cosmonauts Gidzenko and Krikalev, and commander Bill Shepherd, blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Oct 31st, and will stay on the station until the Expedition 2 crew arrives in February 2001.

 

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22 November 2000 - The ISS crew is busy unpacking all the goodies that arrived on the Progress cargo ship that docked with the Station last week.

Crew Continues to Unload Progress
On Nov. 22, the International Space Station continued to orbit the Earth in good shape as the Expedition 1 crew continued to work unloading the Progress Cargo Ship and activating station support systems. The crew reported that it was about 70 percent complete with the transfer of supplies from the Progress to the space station. The transfer is expected to be complete by Nov. 24. The Progress will undock from the station one day following the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour, which is slated for Nov. 30. STS-97 will be the first of three shuttle missions scheduled to visit the Expedition 1 crew during its four-month stay at the station. Endeavour and five astronauts will deliver the P6 Integrated Truss Structure, which contains the U.S. solar arrays.
The most recent International Space Station Status Report. Also, check out the new Expedition 1 crew videos.

 

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18 November 2000 - The ISS crew has received their first "care package" from home - a Russian supply ship! The docking was carried out manually by cosmonauts Gidzenko and Krikalev when the docking camera "went blurry" - talk about keeping your cool! NASA states:

Progress Docks with Space Station
The International Space Station. Computer-generated image courtesy of NASA.A Russian Progress cargo ship docked with the International Space Station Friday at 9:48 p.m. CST (Saturday at 3:48 GMT). Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gidzenko used the station's manual docking system to link the two spacecraft. This is the second Progress to visit the station, and the first to visit the Expedition 1 crew.
The Progress is loaded with supplies and spare parts for the Expedition 1 crew. The cargo ship launched Wednesday at 7:33 p.m. CST (Thursday at 1:33 GMT) from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. Over the next two weeks, the three-member station crew will unload the Progress, which is docked to the Zarya Control Module’s nadir port, or downward facing docking port.
Watch streaming video on NASA TV to see coverage of the Expedition 1 crew's interviews with ABC and CNN on Tuesday at 5:05 a.m. CST (11:05 GMT). Expedition 1 on-orbit imagery is now available in the Gallery.

Station commander Bill Shepherd reports that it's a little noisy up there, but at least they have a working air conditioner and toilet!

Progress launch report (ISS cargo ship) from CNN.

 

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14 November 2000 - The "Alphans" are getting ready for the arrival of the unmanned cargo ship from Baikonur. NASA reports:

Progress Cargo Ship Slated to Launch Wednesday Night
Seated from left to right are Expedition 1 crewmembers Sergei K. Krikalev, William M. Shepherd and Yuri P. Gidzenko in this crew photograph taken in front of a rendition of the International Space Station. Photo courtesy of NASA. Preparations continued onboard the International Space Station for the arrival of a Progress resupply ship, which is scheduled to launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday at 7:32 p.m. CST (Thursday at 1:32 GMT). Tuesday, the three-member station crew performed a rehearsal of the Progress' arrival, which is scheduled for Nov. 17 at 9:07 p.m. CST (Nov. 18 at 3:07 GMT). Also on Tuesday, the crew performed several medical tests and activated and checked out medical equipment.
Expedition 1 on-orbit imagery is now available in the Gallery.

CNN's Miles O'Brien recounts his trip to the Baikonur Cosmodrome to witness the launch of the Space Station crew.

 

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11 November 2000 - NASA made another test of the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle last week, designed to be a lifeboat for the ISS. Get the scoop at the Space News page.

The ISS/Alpha crew had to seek shelter from increased solar radiation on Wednesday. A solar flare prompted flight controllers to send the crew into the more heavily-shielded Zvezda module, but the crew is reported to be in no danger.

 

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10 November 2000 - ISS/Alpha's  life support systems fully operational - NASA reports:

Space Station Crew Activates Oxygen Generation System
Aboard the International Space Station, the Expedition 1 crew turns on the Elektron oxygen generation system. Now, all of the station's critical life support systems are active. Also, the crew was asked to set up a radiation detection monitor in response to an increase of solar flare activity. Meanwhile in Russia, flight controllers continue to prepare for the launch of a Russian Progress cargo ship, which will deliver supplies and spare parts to the space station. The Progress is slated to lift off at 7:32 p.m. CST Nov. 15 (1:32 GMT Nov. 16) and dock with the station Nov. 17 at 9:07 p.m. CST (Nov. 18 at 3:07 GMT). Saturday, the crew will begin a three-day off-duty period.

 

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09 November 2000 - Mission Status Briefing scheduled for today at 4:30PM EST - watch it live on NASA TV! The first briefing was held last week, and they will continue sporadically throughout the mission, with the next one scheduled for Monday, 13 Nov 2000 at 9AM EST.

Will we ever find out who the President is going to be? Ever wonder how astronauts vote when they're in space (or training in Russia!)?

Today's ISS Status Report is here.

 

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08 November 2000 - Key life-support systems installed (you'd think they would have set that up in advance!). NASA reports:

Oxygen Generation System Slated to be Activated Thursday
The International Space Station's first resident crew continued its work setting up its new home. Wednesday, the three-member crew reported that all equipment associated with the Elektron oxygen generation system has been installed. The system is planned to be activated Thursday. Meanwhile in Russia, flight controllers continue to prepare for the launch of a Russian Progress cargo ship, which will deliver supplies and spare parts to the space station. The Progress is slated to lift off at 7:32 p.m. CST Nov. 15 (1:32 GMT Nov. 16) and dock with the station Nov. 17 at 9:07 p.m. CST (Nov. 18 at 3:07 GMT).

The three-man crew got to try out all their nifty new exercise gear this week. It's not just for play: Muscles atrophy in microgravity, so working out is essential to maintaining good health (even more than it is on the ground!).

 

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07 November 2000 - The space station crew are getting a visit from a supply ship in a couple of weeks. NASA reports:

Making the Space Station Home Sweet Home
The Expedition 1 crew continues to make the International Space Station more like home. Part move-in crew, part construction crew, Mission Commander Bill Shepherd and cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev have been very busy installing several key pieces of equipment in the Zvezda living quarters. They have also had to be creative. When the food warmer's power cable was temporarily misplaced, they rigged the power cable from a camera instead. Over the weekend they installed an air conditioner--an important piece of equipment because it also creates water for the crew. They also installed a carbon dioxide scrubber and an oxygen generator. These machines are needed to keep the air inside the orbiting complex healthy.
Crew Completes 1st Week in Space
Tuesday, the Expedition 1 continued to set up the International Space Station as they completed one week in space. The crew installed the final cables in to a Russian Elektron oxygen generation system. The crew also installed a TV monitor for the backup rendezvous system that will used if the automated system fails when a Progress cargo ship rendezvous with the station. The next Progress is scheduled to dock with the station on Nov. 18. Meanwhile, the space station continues to orbit the Earth in good shape.

New videos here.

 

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06 November 2000 - The guys on the Space Station are busy getting their new home ready for their long stay. NASA reports:

Crew Installs Backup Docking System, Exercises for First Time
Monday, the Expedition 1 crew members continued their work on the International Space Station. They installed a backup rendezvous system in the Zvezda Service Module. This manual system will be used if the automatic system failed during an approach of a Progress cargo ship. The next Progress to arrive at the station is scheduled to launch Nov. 16 and dock Nov. 18. Meanwhile, the crew continued to install cables for the Elektron oxygen generation system and continued to set up the computer network system and laptop computers.
It wasn't all work, though. Each crew member exercised on the station for the first time on the bicycle ergometer. The crew will use the treadmill for the first time on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, down on the ground, the astronauts making up the folow-up crews that will live on the Station next year are thrilled that the first three finally got up there. Let's keep this train rolling!!!

Wrap up last week's space news at Florida Today.

 

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05 November 2000 - Alpha's astronauts get life support up and running - NASA reports:

Expedition 1 Crew Continues Work on Station
The International Space Station's first crew members continued a busy and productive pace of work Saturday, activating and installing several key pieces of equipment in the Zvezda living quarters as they began to settle in to life aboard the orbiting complex.
Early Saturday, the crew -- Commander Bill Shepherd, Pilot Yuri Gidzenko and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev - powered up the Vozdukh system in Zvezda, a regenerative air-scrubbing system that removes carbon dioxide from the cabin and vents it overboard. The system has been confirmed working well by Russian flight controllers at Mission Control, Korolev, and the crew has discontinued use of disposable canisters that had initially been used to remove carbon dioxide.

The crew is confined to two of the three sections of "Space Station Alpha", until new solar arrays arrive on STS-97. Then there will be enough electricity to keep all three sections powered up and heated.

L.A. Times editorial here [bottom of page].

UPI: Trip Report Part 6.

 

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04 November 2000 - You think it's easy living in orbit? Try being cramped into two rooms with your room-mates, with nowhere to go to blow off steam. The toilet is tiny, you can only change clothes every five days, and the food comes in bags or tin cans. The Expedition One crew is busily unpacking equipment for their four-month stay, and encountering some difficulties settling in - but it's always that way with a new home.

New video clips at NASA and Spaceflight Now!.

UPI: Trip Report Part 5.

 

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03 November 2000 - So, how do you get water to drink and bathe when the nearest faucet is over 200 miles away? NASA reports:

Life on the Space Station: Making and Recycling Water
Artist's representation of a future ISS configuration. Image courtesy of NASA. Rationing and recycling will be an essential part of daily life on the International Space Station (ISS). In orbit, where Earth's natural life support system is missing, the Space Station itself has to provide abundant power, clean water, and breathable air at the right temperature and humidity--24 hours a day, 7 days a week, indefinitely. Nothing can go to waste. The current crew of ISS, Expedition 1, is using water delivered to the Station by past Space Shuttle missions, but future Station residents are in for clean-up via sponge baths using water distilled from--among other places--their crewmates' breath!

Does the average person know or care about the milestone that has been achieved with the ISS? Jay Leno, in  a Tonight Show "Jay-Walking" segment where he gathers goofy answers to man-in-the-street interviews, asked one college student where the International Space Station was. The reply? "Uh... Texas?"  Maybe he was thinking of Mission Control. We space-geeks know that it is a big deal, though - the last day of October may well have been the last day that humans were ever absent from space

The threesome spent yesterday moving in, flipping on lights and making the Station "come alive". Latest ISS Status Report here.

 

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02 November 2000 - Update 11:30PM EST - After years of haggling over the Space Station's name, NASA chief Dan Goldin finally gave in and let the crew temporarily use the call sign "Alpha". Well, it is catchy, but.... what about SkyLab, Salyut, Mir, etc - were they all "pre-Alpha"s??? Krikalev, Gidzenko, and Shepherd aboard the ISS. Image courtesy of NASA.Some Russians on the ground resent the implication of "Alpha"'s meaning - after all it was the USSR (and later, Russia) who pioneered long-term human habitation of space with their orbital stations. The crew, however, was united in their desire for a name, and clasped hands for the cameras. 

Latest ISS, er, Alpha Status Report here.


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02 November 2000 - Update 7:30AM EST - Expedition One docks with the ISS, and they are now inside! The crew are busy firing up onboard computers, and getting settled in. It only took them 90 minutes to enter the station after the linkup with the Soyuz spacecraft. NASA reports:

Expedition 1 Crew Enters the International Space Station
At 4:23 a.m. CST (10:23 GMT), U.S. Astronaut Bill Shepherd and Russian Cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev began a new era in human space flight when they opened the hatch and entered the International Space Station. The Expedition 1 crew’s four-month stay in the station will begin the permanent human habitation of space. For the remainder of the day, the crew will activate the station’s food warmer, setup the sleeping quarters and perform communications checks with flight controllers in Houston, Texas, and Korolev, Russia. Expedition 1 is scheduled to leave the station in February when the three-member Expedition 2 crew arrives on STS-102.

Follow the mission on NASA TV!


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02 November 2000 - Expedition One to arrive this morning! NASA reports:

Expedition 1 Crew Set to Dock with Station
Image of Expedition 1 crew boarding the Soyuz launch vehicle. Image courtesy of NASA.Aboard the Soyuz space capsule, Mission Commander Bill Shepherd and cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev are preparing for arrival at their new home for four months, the International Space Station. The Soyuz is scheduled to dock with the space station’s Zvezda Service Module at 4:24 a.m. EST (9:24 GMT) on Thursday, November 2. About 90 minutes after docking, the crew is scheduled to open the hatch to the station. Meanwhile, the Soyuz and the space station continue to operate in good condition. Watch this historic docking on NASA Television and on the Web.

NASA plans extensive coverage of the docking. Play-by-play continues at Florida Today and Spaceflight Now!

 

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01 November 2000 - Update 11PM - Expedition One continues to close in on the ISS, with docking scheduled for Thursday morning, shortly before 4:30AM EST. Russian President Vladimir Putin praised the station, urging the trio to "open a new chapter in the history of international space exploration". NASA reports:

Expedition 1 Prepares for Docking
Launch of the Expedition 1 Crew. Image courtesy of NASA/RSA. The Expedition 1 crew completes preparations for docking with the International Space Station at 3:24 a.m. CST (9:24 GMT) Thursday. An automated rendezvous sequence will begin at 1 a.m. (7:00 GMT) Thursday with the first of several rendezvous maneuvers scheduled for 1:25 a.m. (7:25 GMT). At 2:57 a.m. (8:57 GMT), the Soyuz will perform a partial flyaround of the station and begin station-keeping. The final approach is set to begin at 3:15 a.m. (9:15 GMT) leading up to the docking.
After docking, the hatch to the International Space Station will be opened at 4:40 a.m. (10:40 GMT) with Shepherd, Gidzenko, and Krikalev entering their new home in space for the first time. The event will be covered live via audio only but recorded on video. Video playback of the hatch opening will be shown on NASA TV at 6:20 a.m. (12:20 GMT).

Station commander Bill Shepherd also got a surprise call from his wife. "Pick up milk and bread on the way home?" Play-by-play continues at Florida Today and Spaceflight Now!


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01 November 2000 - Update 6PM - The two cosmonauts and one astronaut who comprise Expedition One are racing toward a rendezvous with the ISS. NASA reports:

Expedition 1 Closing in on Station
During its first full day in orbit, the Expedition 1 crew continued to close in on its future home, the International Space Station. Tuesday, Soyuz Commander Yuri Gidzenko performed two rendezvous burns to adjust the Soyuz spacecraft’s orbit. At 10:02 p.m. CST Tuesday (4:02 GMT Wednesday), the Progress cargo ship was commanded to undock from the station to free up the docking port for Expedition 1. The Progress was then commanded to leave orbit and burn up in the atmosphere over the southern Pacific Ocean. Thursday, the Soyuz is scheduled to dock with the space station’s Zvezda Service Module at 3:24 a.m. CST (9:24 GMT). About 90 minutes after docking, the crew is scheduled to open the hatch to the station. Meanwhile, the Soyuz and the space station continue to operate in good condition.

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01 November 2000 - Expedition One continues to orbit the Earth. Russian and American ground personnel celebrated last night's successful launch. The Soyuz TM-31 spacecraft is closing in on the ISS, ready to dock with the Pressurized Mating Adapter that had been occupied by the Progress cargo ship. NASA reported:

Expedition 1 Closing in on Station
A Soyuz rocket lifts off from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Image courtesy of NASA. The International Space Station's first resident crew, Expedition 1, continues to close in on its new home. The three-member crew launched on a Soyuz rocket from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, at 1:53 a.m. CST (7:53 GMT) today. Before going to sleep today, the crew successfully deployed docking probes and checked out motion control systems on the Soyuz capsule. Also, two rendezvous engine burns were performed to keep the capsule on course. A third burn will be performed Wednesday morning. Tonight, the Progress cargo ship will be undocked from the station and commanded to re-enter Earth's atmosphere, where it will burn up. Expedition 1 is scheduled to dock with the station Thursday at 3:20 a.m. CST (9:20 GMT).

The Progress, now filled with trash from the last 2 Shuttle missions, was commanded to undock and de-orbit, burning up over the atmosphere. That's one fancy garbage incinerator! 

Here are yesterday's noon and night Mission Control Status Reports. 

UPI: Trip Report Part 4.

 

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31 October 2000 - UPDATE 7:30AM EST - Expedition One is in orbit! The Soyuz rocket lifted off from Launch Complex 1 at Baikonur, shortly before 3AM EST today. NASA reports:

Expedition 1 Crew Launches
Cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev (far right) are viewed in the Soyuz capsule during ascent into orbit. Just out of sight is American astronaut Bill Shepherd. Image courtesy of NASA/RSA. At 1:53 a.m. CST (7:53 GMT), the International Space Station’s first resident crew launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan to begin its two-day journey to the station. U.S. Astronaut Bill Shepherd, Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gidzenko and Russian Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev were launched atop a Soyuz rocket. Meanwhile, the space station continues to orbit the Earth in good condition as it awaits the arrival of its first crew. Expedition 1 is scheduled to dock with the station Nov. 2 at 3:20 a.m. CST (9:20 GMT). Then, approximately 90 minutes after docking, the crew will begin the permanent human presence on the station when they open the hatch to the station’s Zvezda Service Module.

CNN: Crew blasts off for International Space Station
CBS: Blastoff Into A New Era
BBC: Landmark Space Mission Underway
Spaceflight Now: Vanguard crew heads for four-month stay in space
Space.com: Expedition One News Update
UPI: Soyuz spaceship launches first space station crew

More play-by-play at Florida Today.


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31 October 2000 - Happy Halloween! - Expedition One is set to launch into orbit only a couple of hours from now. Watch the show on NASA TV! Play-by-play at Spaceflight Now. These three people will become the first of a long chain...

Did You Know? Expedition Commander Bill Shepherd (a Navy SEAL) will be only the second American to go into space on an expendable rocket since Apollo-Soyuz in 1975! (Norm Thagard was the first to hitch a ride on a Russian booster - for a 1995 Mir mission). Like Thagard, the ISS crew will return to Earth on a Space Shuttle. "Shep" quotes Yuri Gagarin: "Let's Go!"

UPI: Trip Report Part 3.

 

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30 October 2000 - Expedition One lifts off tonight (Tuesday morning, 2:53AM EST) for their new home in space! NASA reports:

Flight controllers in the United States and Russia are preparing the International Space Station for the arrival of its first resident crew. Expedition 1 is scheduled to launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Oct. 31 at 1:53 a.m. CST (7:53 GMT).
Watch streaming video on NASA TV to see the launch of the Expedition 1 crew. Live coverage begins at 1 a.m. CST (7:00 GMT) Oct. 31.

Not wanting to tempt fate, the crew will make a few important stops on their way to the launchpad - including answering the "call of nature" on the rear wheels of the cosmonaut bus! This is a custom going back to Yuri Gagarin (who probably wasn't thinking he was starting a new tradition at the time - he just had to go, that's all!). Other traditions include the viewing of the same movie he watched on the evening before his flight, and a visit to his grave at the Kremlin (the crew paid their respects on Oct 16th).

Speaking of launchpads, the trio will lift off from the very same pad that saw Gagarin's historic flight inaugurate the age of human space exploration in 1961. Their ride will be a little more modern, though - they are going up on a Soyuz rocket, topped by the latest-model Soyuz spacecraft (which will also serve as a lifeboat during their 4-month stay).

Wrap up last week's space news at Florida Today.

UPI: Trip Report Part 2.

 

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29 October 2000 - The first permanent crew of the International Space Station launches from Baikonur on Monday night/early Tuesday! Lots of articles at Florida Today. Who is on Expedition One? NASA explains:

Expedition 1 Crew Contains Three
On Oct. 16, the Expedition 1 crew visited the grave of Soviet cosmonaut and the first human to fly in space, Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin. Paying respects to Gagarin is customary in Russia prior to space flight. Pictured left to right are Sergei K. Krikalev, William M. Shepherd and Yuri Pavlovich Gidzenko. Photo courtesy of NASA.The Expedition 1 crew is comprised of three veterans of human space flight who will make history as the first resident crew of the International Space Station. U.S. Astronaut Bill Shepherd will serve as the Expedition 1 commander. He will be responsible for the overall safety and success of the mission. Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gidzenko will serve as the Soyuz commander. He will be responsible for all of the systems on the Soyuz spacecraft from launch until docking and during landing if the crew needs to use it in the event of an emergency. Russian Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev will serve as the flight engineer. He will be responsible for most of the station's systems.

The trio is pictured here visiting the grave of Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space. It is a cosmonaut tradition to visit his burial site before a space flight.

UPI: Trip Report Part 1.

 

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28 October 2000 - The Expedition One crew will play host to three Shuttle flights during their four-month say in orbit. NASA explains:

First Crew to See 3 Shuttle Missions
While the Expedition 1 crew inhabits the International Space Station, three space shuttle missions will visit the station to continue on-orbit construction. The first mission will be STS-97 on Flight 4A, which will deliver U.S. solar arrays to add to the station's power capability. Then, STS-98 on Flight 5A will deliver and install the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. The third mission will be STS-102 on Flight 5A.1, which will deliver equipment racks for Destiny and the Expedition 2 crew. Expedition 1 will return to Earth on STS-102.

 

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27 October 2000 - The first resident crew of the ISS is "raring to go". After years of training and delays, they launch from Baikonur this Tuesday! NASA reports:

Station Waits for Expedition 1
With the arrival of the International Space Station's first resident crew scheduled for next week, U.S. and Russian flight controllers are preparing the station for its new inhabitants. Sunday, flight controllers will conduct a dress rehearsal of the docking. Nov. 2, the Soyuz spacecraft carrying the three-member Expedition 1 crew will dock with the International Space Station's Zvezda Service Module at 3:20 a.m. CST (9:20 GMT). Currently, the port that the crew will dock to is occupied by a Progress cargo ship. Flight controllers will transfer fuel from the Progress to the station before it is undocked from the station on Nov. 1. Expedition 1 is slated to launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, at 1:53 a.m. CST (7:53 GMT) Oct. 31. NASA TV will have live coverage of the launch beginning at 1 a.m. CST (7:00 GMT).

News From Space is starting coverage of Shuttle mission STS-97! Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch on 30 November 2000 on a mission to the ISS to install new solar arrays and electrical systems, as well as an IMAX 3D camera. The STS-97 Mission Journal makes its debut tonight

 

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26 October 2000 - The prime and backup crews for Expedition One to the International Space Station left for the Baikonur Cosmodrome today. Two Russians and one American will blast into orbit from there next week.

 

To keep going back in the timeline, check our Space News Archive for October 2000September 2000August 2000July 2000, June 2000, Apr - May 2000, Jan - Feb 2000Oct - Dec 1999, and before.

NASA has ISS Status Reports archived from 2000, 1999, and 1998.

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