STS-102 Mission Journal

[Space News]
[Gift Shop]
[Home]

 

NASA's
Astronomy
Picture
of the Day

We are a FOSD! (That's Friend Of Space Day).

NewsFromSpace.com is a Friend Of Space Day

Embrace Space at Spaceday.com!

Watch live video on NASA TV! (Check schedule here).

Live mission audio

STS-102 Mission Journal

Note: The links below will open up in one new browser window. For best viewing, size the two web browsers so that they don't take up the entire screen - this way, you will be able to go back and forth to all the stories without losing your place.
Click the Refresh button to make sure you have the newest version.

New! Scroll right for Mission Links ------------>>>

STS-102 crew portrait (with ISS crews) courtesy of NASA.

Shuttle Discovery is on mission STS-102 to Space Station Alpha!

NASA image of STS-102 Insignia.
The mission patch features the names of the four core astronauts at top, with a strip below containing the names of the "Up" and "Down" crewmembers from ISS.

Jump to latest STS-102 coverage

 

 

This page sponsored by:

Countdown
Creations

Shop at Countdown Creations!

Featuring Astronaut Flight Suits in all sizes!

bullet

21 March 2001 - Landing! - Shuttle Discovery touched down at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, right on time at 2:31AM EST, bringing a successful close to mission STS-102, as well as the first tour of duty for the International Space Station. NASA reports:

Shuttle Discovery Lands
Space Shuttle Discovery lands at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on March 21, 2001, to end STS-102. NASA image.
STS-102 completed a successful mission to the International Space Station when Space Shuttle Discovery landed at 1:31 a.m. CST (07:31 GMT) Wednesday at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Discovery’s touchdown also marked the return of the space station’s first resident crew - Expedition One. Mission accomplishments include the delivery of the Expedition Two crew and the contents of the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to the station and the completion of two successful space walks. STS-102 landing at night, as seen in this NASA thermal image.In addition to returning the Expedition One crew to Earth, STS-102 returned Leonardo - a reusable cargo carrier built by the Italian Space Agency. STS-102 was the 103rd shuttle flight and the eighth shuttle mission to visit the station.

A sudden improvement in the weather saved NASA from an expensive landing at a backup site in California.


bullet

21 March 2001 - 1:05AM EST - Go for de-orbit burn! Weather has improved, so Discovery will fire braking thrusters at 1:26AM EST, for a landing 65 minutes later. Keep checking the play-by play links at right, and watch NASA TV for live coverage.


bullet

21 March - 12:45AM EST - Spaceflight Now! reports that the STS-102 astronauts are "fluid loading" - drinking lots of fluids (how 'bout some Tang?), which helps counteract the effects of returning to Earth's gravity. That is a good sign that they are going for the next landing opportunity at KSCNASA states:

Flight controllers decided to pass on Space Shuttle Discovery's first landing attempt at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., due to poor weather. The next opportunity is at 1:31 a.m. CST (07:31 GMT) Wednesday.
Watch NASA TV for continuing coverage of STS-102. Click here for information about upcoming events. Landing Ground Tracks are now available.

With luck, Discovery will touch down at 2:31AM EST.

 

bullet

20 March 2001 - Evening Update - Weather at Florida is not up to snuff - we'll have to wait a couple more hours until the Shuttle lands. NASA reports:

Flight Controllers Wave Off First Landing Attempt in Florida
Flight controllers decided to wave off STS-102's first landing opportunity at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., due to high winds, low cloud cover and precipitation. The next opportunity available to Space Shuttle Discovery is at 1:31 a.m. CST (07:31 GMT) Wednesday at Kennedy. Two opportunities also exist at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. Weather forecasters and flight controllers continue to monitor the situation.
STS-102 is returning home after a successful visit to the International Space Station. While at the station, the STS-102 crew delivered the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, delivered the Expedition Two crew and performed two successful space walks. Returning to Earth on Discovery are the Expedition One crew and Leonardo, which contains a ton of cargo and trash.

The next landing opportunity is at 2:31AM EST at KSC. It is possible that they will land at California's Edwards AFB later tonight (Wednesday morning).


bullet

20 March - Afternoon Update - The Space Shuttle is landing tonight, but weather at KSC is a concern. NASA reports:

Students Await Discovery's Landing Tonight, Carrying Their Experiment
NASA photo of students and their experimentA group of students in Delta Junction, Alaska, is particularly interested in Discovery's scheduled landing tonight. The flight experiment they and their teacher developed, "The Effect of Cosmic Radiation on Lichens," at the Delta Cyber Charter School, will be aboard. The experiment, part of the NASA Student Involvement Program (NSIP), was one of ten student experiments flown on this mission. Read more about their experiment

In space, the crew of STS-102 aboard Discovery continue preparations for their return to Earth, scheduled for 12:56 a.m. EST, tonight. Discovery carries the three crew members of Expedition One, returning home after more than four months aboard the International Space Station. Sergei K. Krikalev, William M. Shepherd and Yuri P. Gidzenko will land in specially designed reclining seats to help ease the stress of landing and Earth's gravity on their bodies.


bullet

20 March 2001 - The Shuttle is heading home tonightNASA reports:

Discovery Crew Set For Landing
From left are Expedition One crewmembers Yuri Gidzenko, Bill Shepherd and Sergei Krikalev. With their increment complete, they are now onboard Space Shuttle Discovery for the ride back to Earth after undocking from the International Space Station. NASA image.The crew of STS-102 spent the day readying themselves for their return to Earth, which is scheduled for later today. Earlier in the flight day, the Expedition One crew fielded questions from CNN, CBS News and KNBC-TV in Los Angeles, Calif.
Discovery's first landing opportunity is at 11:56 p.m. CST Tuesday (05:56 GMT Wednesday) at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. However, forecasts indicate that there is a chance that weather conditions may be unacceptable due to rain and low clouds. If Discovery's first attempt is waved off, another landing attempt is available at 12:26 CST a.m. (06:26 GMT) Wednesday.

Weather concerns could send Discovery to a west cost landing.

 

bullet

19 March 2001 - Evening Update - Discovery is getting ready to touch down in Florida shortly before midnight tomorrowNASA reports:

Crew to Prepare for Landing
The International Space Station orbits the Earth following the undocking of Space Shuttle Discovery. This image was taken from Discovery as it performed a flyaround. NASA image. In its final scheduled full day in orbit, the STS-102 crew will prepare for landing. The crew will check out flight controls, test fire Space Shuttle Discovery's steering jets, stow equipment and adjust the shuttle's orbit. At 11:12 p.m. today (05:12 GMT Tuesday), the Expedition One crew will field questions from CNN, CBS News and KNBC-TV in Los Angeles, Calif.
Discovery's first landing opportunity is at 11:56 p.m. CST Tuesday (05:56 GMT Wednesday) at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. However, forecasts indicate that there is a chance that weather conditions may be unacceptable due to rain and low clouds. Landing Ground Tracks are available.

The Flight Day 12 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

19 March 2001 - Discovery has undocked from the Space Station, marking the official end of Expedition One to the ISSNASA reports:

Discovery Undocks from Station
NASA image: STS-102 Pilot Jim Kelly
At 10:32 p.m. CST Sunday (04:32 GMT Monday), Space Shuttle Discovery undocked from the International Space Station. Pilot Jim Kelly is scheduled to perform an hour-long flyaround of the station so that the STS-102 crew take photos and video of the orbital outpost. Then, Kelly will fire Discovery's engines so STS-102 can begin its voyage back to Earth.
While at the station, the STS-102 crew delivered the Expedition Two crew, delivered the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and conducted two space walks. Discovery will be returning Leonardo, which is packed with a ton of trash and cargo, and the Expedition One crew to Earth. Discovery spent 8 days, 21 hours and 54 minutes docked to the station. At the time of undocking, Discovery and the station were flying over the South American country Guyana.
Watch NASA TV at 11:12 p.m. CST Monday (05:12 GMT Tuesday) to see the Expedition One crew - Commander Bill Shepherd, Pilot Yuri Gidzenko and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev - participate in interviews with CNN, CBS News and KNBC-TV in Los Angeles, Calif. NASA TV Schedule

Now the STS-102 astronauts (with their three new crewmembers) turn their thoughts towards home, with a return to Earth scheduled for a few minutes before midnight Tuesday night/Wednesday morning. They also commented on the impending demise of Russia's Mir station - where four of the ten people in orbit right now have served.

 

bullet

18 March 2001 - Evening Update - With the hatch closed between Discovery and the ISS, the STS-102 crew prepare to undock. NASA reports:

Discovery to Undock from Station
The aft portion of the Space Shuttle Discovery, framed by the window of Destiny and backdropped against a massive cloud cover on Earth. NASA image.
The STS-102 and Expedition One crews have left the International Space Station. Final hatch closure occurred today at 8:32 p.m. CST (02:32 GMT Monday), and it marked the end of the Expedition One crew's stay onboard the station. Preparations for undocking are now under way. Discovery is slated to undock today at 10:32 p.m. CST (04:32 GMT Monday). Pilot Jim Kelly will perform the undocking and then make hour-long fly-around of the orbital outpost before beginning the journey home.
Answers for Ask the Crew and Ask the MCC questions are available.

The Flight Day 11 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

18 March 2001 - The reusable "Leonardo" module has been detached from the ISS and stowed back in Discovery's payload bay. NASA reports:

Leonardo Back Inside Discovery
Mission Specialist Andy Thomas guides the shuttle's robotic arm toward Leonardo for removal from the station back to the shuttle's payload bay. NASA image.
The Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module was returned to Space Shuttle Discovery’s payload bay this morning at 6:08 CST (12:08 GMT). Mission Specialist Andy Thomas used the shuttle’s robot arm to detach the reusable cargo carrier from the International Space Station and place it in the cargo bay. Leonardo, which delivered more than five tons of equipment and experiments to the station, contains almost a ton of trash and cargo that will be returning to Earth. Now, attention turns toward STS-102’s departure from the station. Discovery is slated to undock from the station at 10:32 CST tonight (04:32 GMT Monday).
Watch NASA TV to see continuing coverage of STS-102. Just before tonight’s final hatch closure between Space Shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station, which is slated for 7:37 CST (01:37 GMT Monday), there will be a short ceremony marking the change of station command from Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd to Expedition Two Commander Yury Usachev. Then at 10:32 CST tonight (04:32 GMT Monday), Space Shuttle Discovery is slated to undock. NASA TV Schedule

Earlier, concerns over possible on-board computer problems caused flight controllers to order diagnostic tests to be run. All is well with Discovery's computer systems. Watch NASA TV for tonight's handover ceremony at 8:37PM EST, and the undocking at 11:32PM EST.

 

bullet

17 March 2001 - Evening Update - The Leonardo module is packed up and ready to be returned to Discovery's payload bay. NASA reports:

Controllers, Crew Complete Successful Computer Test
Flight controllers spent some time Saturday night evaluating the status of computers onboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Even though the computers had not experienced a problem, managers decided to transition software loads as a confidence test to verify the computers' health. The test verified that the computers were working properly. The concerns were about whether a quick power up of two Discovery computers in the crew's previous flight day could cause a software glitch. The power up was performed to generate more heat to clear ice in a cooling system line.
The STS-102 crew received a "go" to close the hatch to the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module at 10:30 p.m. CST Saturday (04:30 GMT Sunday). It will be detached from the International Space Station and returned to the shuttle's payload bay Sunday morning.
Watch NASA TV at 11:52 p.m. CST Saturday (05:52 GMT Sunday) to see coverage of the unberthing of the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module from the International Space Station and its return to Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay, which is slated for 12:57 a.m. CST (06:57 GMT) Sunday. NASA TV Schedule

Discovery will undock from the ISS on Sunday night at 11:30PM EST. The Flight Day 10 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

17 March 2001 - The first Space Station crew is looking forward to coming home with Discovery. The orbiter used its thrusters to give the Space Station another boost. NASA reports:

Shuttle Jets Give Station Boost
The crews of Space Shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station spent their day carefully packing the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. The astronauts are to exit Leonardo at 8:42 p.m. CST today (02:42 GMT Sunday). Using the shuttle’s robotic arm, they are to latch it in the payload bay at 12:57 a.m. CST (06:57 GMT) Sunday.
During the second space walk of STS-102 Astronaut Paul Richards works inside the shuttle's payload bay with the Earth beneath him. NASA image.Also today, Commander Jim Wetherbee set in motion the third and final reboost of the station’s altitude by executing a programmed series of gentle steering jet firings. The third reboost makes the total reboost imparted during the STS-102 mission a little more than seven statute miles.
Discovery is scheduled to undock from the station at 10:32 p.m. CST Sunday (04:32 GMT Monday).

Discovery is slated to land at KSC Tuesday night/early Wednesday morning - 12:55AM EST March 21st. The Flight Day 9 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.

 

bullet

16 March 2001 - Evening Update - Discovery and Space Station Alpha are spending an extra day in docked operationsNASA reports:

Shuttle's Jets to Raise Station's Orbit
The STS-102, Expedition One and Expedition Two crews participate in a crew news conference with journalists on Earth. NASA image. For the third time this mission, STS-102 Commander Jim Wetherbee will fire Space Shuttle Discovery's steering jets to raise the International Space Station's orbit. When the reboost maneuver is completed, the station will be more than 11.2 kilometers (7 miles) higher than when Discovery arrived. Also, the crew will continue joint operations with the Expedition Two crew. They will continue loading the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module for the trip home. Later in the workday, Wetherbee, Pilot Jim Kelly and Mission Specialists Andy Thomas and Paul Richards will take time to answer questions from ABC News and NBC News' Weekend Today Show.

The Flight Day 8 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

16 March 2001 - Packing continues for the trip home. NASA reports:

STS-102 Welcomes Extra Day
The crew of Discovery welcomed the addition of another day orbiting the Earth at the International Space Station as they continued to pack for the trip home. Discovery's return will mark the homecoming of the first resident space station crew.
The Italian-built Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module now will be unberthed from the station and nestled back in Discovery's payload bay at 1:17 a.m. CST (07:17 GMT) Sunday. The crew of Discovery will undock from the station about 10:30 p.m. CST Sunday (04:30 GMT Monday), then spend Monday stowing equipment and preparing for a return trip to Earth. The STS-102 crew will return to the Kennedy Space Center at 11:55 p.m. CST Tuesday (05:55 GMT Wednesday).

 

bullet

15 March 2001 - Evening Update - We just found out that Discovery's mission is being stretched another dayNASA reports:

STS-102 to Stay Extra Day at Station
Configuration of the International Space Station during STS-102. NASA image. Just after the morning wake-up call, Mission Control informed the STS-102 crew that it will spend an extra day at the International Space Station. The extension will allow the crew and flight controllers to ensure that the items returning to Earth in the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module have been properly stowed. Leonardo will be removed from the station and placed back into Discovery's payload bay Sunday morning. Undocking will now occur late Sunday night and landing is slated for 11:59 p.m. CST Tuesday (05:59 GMT Wednesday).
During the current workday, the crews will continue loading items into Leonardo. Later in the day, STS-102 Commander Jim Wetherbee will use Discovery's steering jets to raise the station's orbit.
Answers for Ask the Crew and Ask the MCC questions are available.

The Flight Day 7 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

15 March - Afternoon Update - The crew of Discovery (now containing the old Expedition One crew from the Space Station) are getting ready for this weekend's undocking - and that includes packing up gear and taking out the trash! NASA reports:

Discovery Crew Packs Up Leonardo
STS-102 Commander Jim Wetherbee and Pilot Jim Kelly answer questions during an interview inside the station's Unity Module. NASA image.
Today, STS-102 Mission Specialist Andy Thomas coordinated the transfer of equipment, supplies, trash and luggage between the International Space Station and Space Shuttle Discovery with the help of Expedition Two Commander Yury Usachev and fellow Mission Specialist Paul Richards. All 4.5 metric tons (5 tons) of equipment and supplies delivered aboard the Leonardo Module have been transferred to the station. The crew is now concentrating on packing trash, unneeded equipment and luggage in the Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module for return to Earth.
Commander Jim Wetherbee and Pilot Jim Kelly answered questions posed by reporters in the area of Burlington, Iowa, Kelly’s hometown. Also, Wetherbee, Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd, Usachev and Thomas talked with school children in Dundee, Scotland, who are following the mission because the crew is carrying a piece of the sailing research ship R.R.S. Discovery, which was launched 100 years ago at Dundee.

Andy Thomas, a native of "Down Under" (Australia), enjoyed the view from "Up Over" (that's orbit - OK, we just made that up). He and crewmate Paul Richards made their first spacewalks Tuesday.


bullet

15 March 2001 - Docked operations continue. NASA reports:

Home, Sweet Space Home
NASA image of astronauts in Space Station.In orbit, the crews of Discovery and Expedition Two have unloaded all 4.5 metric tons (5 tons) of equipment and supplies delivered aboard the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and are now concentrating on packing trash, unneeded equipment and luggage in the module for return to Earth. As Discovery undocks on Saturday night and leaves for Earth, the new residents of the International Space Station (ISS) will spend four months in a very unusual residence, indeed. On the ground, the ISS would be a very odd looking building -- but space is an unusual place to live! There are good reasons why the erector-set-styled ISS looks the way it does.

Was yesterday's report of an evasive maneuver (to avoid a piece of debris released during Sunday's EVA) a false alarm?

 

bullet

14 March 2001 - Evening Update - The docked orbiter-station complex had to dodge some space junk today. The object was a hand tool accidentally released into space. NASA reports:

Crew to Pack for Trip Home
Astronaut Paul W. Richards, mission specialist, waves toward his crew mate during the second STS-102 space walk. NASA photo.With almost all of the equipment delivered in the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module unloaded, the focus of Space Shuttle Discovery's crew will be packing up and loading Leonardo with trash and unneeded equipment for the return home. The STS-102 crew will also get some time off in the second half of its day.
Wednesday morning, STS-102 Commander Jim Wetherbee fired Discovery's engines a day early to raise the orbit of the station and shuttle to ensure that they would avoid a piece of equipment that was accidentally released during a space walk earlier in the mission. The other two reboost maneuvers scheduled for the mission will occur on schedule.

The Flight Day 7 images are now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

14 March 2001 - Work aboard the Station continues, with 10 astronauts (is that a record?) transferring supplies. All the Expedition One crewmembers are now off the Station and on board Discovery. NASA reports:

Crews Continue Joint Operations
Expedition One Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev moves equipment out of the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module as Expedition One Flight Engineer Jim Voss (in the background) unpacks equipment in Leonardo. NASA image.With completion of STS-102's scheduled space walks, Space Shuttle Discovery's crew is involved in joint operations with the International Space Station crew. Watch NASA TV for continuing coverage of STS-102. Click here for information about upcoming events.

STS-102 Flight Day 5 and Flight Day 6 images are available in the NASA Gallery.

 

bullet

13 March 2001 - Evening Update - Now that the EVAs are done, it's time to keep moving supplies. NASA reports:

Crews to Continue Joint Operations
NASA image: Astronauts Thomas and Richards during the second space walk.The STS-102 crew will continue joint operations with the International Space Station crew today. The focus will be the final crewmember exchange and the unloading of the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. Expedition Two Flight Engineer Susan Helms will swap places with Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd on the station. Shepherd will join the shuttle crew.
Leonardo, which was built by the Italian Space Agency, contained more than 4.5 metric tons (5 tons) of equipment and supplies when it was attached to the station Monday morning. Currently, the crews are ahead of schedule in the unloading process.

The Flight Day 6 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

13 March - Afternoon Update - Activities outside the ISS are finished for this trip. NASA reports:

2nd Space Walk Complete
NASA photo of astronauts on spacewalkMission Specialists Andy Thomas and Paul Richards wrapped up the second spacewalk of STS-102 early this morning. Now, the crew of STS-102 turns its attention to resuming joint operations with the space station crew. Tonight, Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd joins the rest of his crew on the shuttle. As the "captain of the ship" he is the last member of the Expedition One crew to leave.

When "Shep" leaves the Station, Expedition One will pretty much be over. His command does not officially end until the hatch closes between Discovery and Alpha.


bullet

13 March 2001 - Astronauts Thomas and Richards are back inside Discovery this morning after finishing this mission's assembly work on the Station. NASA reports:

Second Space Walk Complete
Mission Specialists Andy Thomas and Paul Richards wrapped up the second space walk of STS-102 at 5:44 a.m. CST (11:44 GMT) today. The space walk - the 18th in the history of the station - lasted 6 hours, 21 minutes. The space walkers completed tasks to prepare the outside of the International Space Station for the arrival of its robot arm, which is slated for April. They installed an External Stowage Platform for spare parts and inspected a probe that is designed to measure the amount of electrical charge on the outside of the station. Pilot Jim Kelly was the shuttle's robot arm operator and Astronaut Susan Helms was the space walk choreographer. Now, the crew of STS-102 turns its attention to resuming joint operations with the space station crew. The last crew member exchange is tonight when Helms joins her Expedition Two crewmates on the station and Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd joins the rest of his crew on the shuttle. Among other activities, the two crews will continue unloading the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module.

 

bullet

12 March 2001 - Evening Update - The Italian-built cargo module, "Leonardo" (as in Da Vinci) is attached to the Space Station, and the second of two spacewalks is underway. NASA reports:

Crew to Conduct Space Walk
NASA image: The International Space Station.STS-102 Mission Specialists Paul Richards and Andy Thomas are scheduled to begin the second space walk of the mission and the 18th in the history of the International Space Station at 10:47 p.m. CST today (04:47 GMT Tuesday). The two space walkers will complete tasks to prepare the outside of the station for the arrival of its robot arm, which is slated for April. Then, they will climb to the top of the station's solar array structure and try to tap a brace into place for the port side array. Also, they will hook up an External Stowage Platform, and they will inspect a probe that is designed to measure the amount of electrical discharge outside of the station. The space walkers will be assisted by Pilot Jim Kelly, who will operate the shuttle's robot arm, and Astronaut Susan Helms, who will choreograph the space walk. It is scheduled to wrap up at 5:17 a.m. CST (11:17 GMT) Tuesday.
Second Space Walk Tonight
As Jim Voss became the International Space Station's most recent resident today, trading places with Expedition One crew member Sergei Krikalev, STS-102 Mission Specialists Paul Richards and Andy Thomas checked out the space suits they will wear for STS-102's second space walk, scheduled to begin at 11:47 p.m. EST tonight. Richards and Thomas will finish connecting cables on the lab cradle assembly--the mounting location for the station's robotic arm when it arrives next month--install an external stowage platform on the hull of Destiny, and hook up cables that will provide heater power to spare equipment that will be stored there. They will also place a pump and flow control subassembly that regulates ammonia coolant flow on the platform and inspect the floating potential probe that is designed to measure the electrical charge on the outside of the station. Watch the action live on NASA Television and NASA TV on the Web.

The Flight Day 5 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

12 March - Afternoon Update - The STS-102 crew have attached the Leonardo module to the Space Station. It is a reusable cargo carrier built by the Italian Space Agency. NASA reports:

Station and Shuttle Crews Begin Work Together
NASA image of Leonardo module in Shuttle bay.Discovery docked with the International Space Station over the weekend and the crews immediately got to work. Two of the Station crew members, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko, have changed places with Yury Usachev and Jim Voss. The astronauts have performed a space walk and installed the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module aboard the Station. A second spacewalk is scheduled for 11:47 p.m. EST tonight. Expedition One commander Bill Shepherd is working closely with newly arrived Expedition Two commander Usachev to ensure a smooth hand-off of responsibilities. Shepherd will officially change places with astronaut Susan Helms on Tuesday. This final crew exchange will mark the beginning of Expedition Two's four month mission aboard the orbiting outpost.

The mission's second EVA is scheduled for tonight.


bullet

12 March 2001 - The ISS crew swap continues. NASA reports:

Crew Prepares for Next Space Walk
Space Shuttle Discovery's robot arm lifts the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module out of the orbiter's payload bay. NASA image. As Jim Voss became the International Space Station's most recent resident, STS-102 Mission Specialists Paul Richards and Andy Thomas checked out the space suits they will wear for STS-102's second space walk, which is scheduled to begin at 10:47 p.m. CST Monday (4:47 GMT Tuesday). Richards and Thomas will finish connecting cables on the Launch Cradle Assembly, which will be the mounting location for the station's robotic arm when it arrives next month and install an External Stowage Platform on the hull of Destiny and hook up cables that will provide heater power to spare equipment that will be stored there. They will also place a Pump and Flow Control Subassembly that regulates ammonia coolant flow on the platform and inspect the Floating Potential Probe that is designed to measure the electrical charge on the outside of the station.

 

bullet

11 March 2001 - Evening Update - Today's spacewalk by astronauts Voss and Helms was nearly 9 hours long - a Shuttle record! Talk about a tough day at the office!! NASA reports:

STS-102 to Install Leonardo
It will be a busy day for the STS-102 crew as it transfers equipment between Space Shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station and installs the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. The hatches between the two spacecraft will be opened tonight at 8:12 CST (Monday at 02:12 GMT). Mission Specialist Andy Thomas is scheduled to begin lifting Leonardo -- a reusable cargo carrier built by the Italian Space Agency -- out of Discovery's payload bay at 9:12 p.m. CST (03:12 GMT) with Discovery's robot arm. He will attach it to the station at about 10:57 p.m. CST (04:57 GMT). Discovery will receive a new crewmember when Astronaut Jim Voss, who is joining the station crew, is replaced by Expedition One Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev. The hatches are slated to be closed Monday at 4:02 a.m. CST (10:02 GMT).

The Flight Day 4 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

11 March - Afternoon Update - EVA 1 is complete. NASA reports:

Astronauts Complete Space Walk
Astronaut Jim Voss removes an early communications antenna from Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 which is attached to the Unity Module. NASA ImageAstronauts Susan Helms and Jim Voss wrapped STS-102's first space walk today at 8:08 a.m. CST (14:08 GMT). During the space walk, Helms and Voss prepared an International Space Station docking port for relocation and prepped the outside of the station for the arrival of its robot arm, which will be delivered in April. Near the conclusion of the space walk, STS-102 Mission Specialist Andy Thomas moved the docking port from the Earth-facing berthing mechanism on the Unity Module to its left-side mechanism. The relocation was performed to make room for tonight's installation of the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. The space walk lasted 8 hours, 56 minutes and was the 17th in the history of the station. In addition to the installation of Leonardo tonight, the shuttle crew will re-enter the station, and Voss will become a member of the station crew when he trades places with Expedition One Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev.

Today's spacewalk turned out to be the longest in Shuttle history!


bullet

11 March 2001 - The first EVA of the mission began last night (or early today, depending on your timezone). NASA reports:

Astronauts Begin Space Walk
NASA image: Astronaut Jim Voss conducts a space walk.STS-102’s first space walk began Saturday at 11:12 p.m. CST (05:12 GMT). Space walkers Susan Helms and Jim Voss will prepare one of the International Space Station’s docking ports - Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 - for a move to make room for Sunday's installation of the Leonardo transfer module. Other tasks for Voss and Helms include preparing the outside of the U.S. Destiny Laboratory for the arrival of the station’s robot arm during STS-100 in April.
They are being assisted by Mission Specialist Andy Thomas and Pilot Jim Kelly, who are operating the Space Shuttle Discovery’s robot arm, and Mission Specialist Paul Richards, who is choreographing the space walk. The shuttle’s robot arm will be used to move the docking port near the completion of the space walk, which is slated to end Sunday at 06:40 a.m. (12:40 GMT). This is the 17th space walk in the space station assembly sequence.

 

bullet

10 March 2001 - Evening Update - Discovery is docked with the ISS, and her astronauts are preparing for the first spacewalk of the mission. NASA reports:

Astronauts to Conduct Space Walk
This view from Space Shuttle Discovery's robotic arm shows the space station's Pressurized Mating Adapter (center right) docked inside the shuttle's payload bay. NASA image. Astronauts Jim Voss and Susan Helms will begin the first of STS-102's two scheduled space walks tonight at 10:47 CST (Saturday at 04:47 GMT). They will be assisted by Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, who will be operating Space Shuttle Discovery's robot arm, and Mission Specialist Paul Richards, the space walk choreographer. The two space walkers will prepare one of the International Space Station's docking ports - Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 - for transfer from the Unity Module's downward facing berthing mechanism to the berthing mechanism on the Node's left side. Astronauts Susan Helms, on the left, and Jim Voss go over a checklist as they prepare for their space walk. NASA image. The shuttle's robot arm will be used to move the docking port near the end of the space walk, which is slated to last more than seven hours. Other tasks for the Voss and Helms will include preparing the outside of the U.S. Destiny Laboratory for the arrival of the station's robot arm during STS-100 in April.

The Flight Day 3 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

10 March 2001 - The Discovery orbiter is docked with the ISS, and the two crews met. NASA reports:

Discovery Docks with Station
NASA computer image of Space Shuttle Discovery docking with the International Space StationSpace Shuttle Discovery docked with the International Space Station today at 12:38 a.m. CST (06:38 GMT). The hatches between the two spacecraft were opened at 2:51 a.m. CST (08:51 GMT), and the two crews greeted each other. STS-102 is the eighth shuttle mission to visit the orbital outpost. Discovery is transporting the Expedition Two crew and the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. It will be the first crew change-out for the multinational orbiting outpost.
The two spacecraft were flying above the southern Pacific Ocean, just east of New Zealand at the time of docking.

Communications problems delayed the docking, which had been scheduled for about an hour earlier. The Shuttle crew boarded the Space Station last night.

 

bullet

09 March - Afternoon Update - STS-102 continues to chase the Space Station. NASA reports:

Discovery to Dock with Station This Weekend
STS-102 Commander James Wetherbee and Expedition Two Commander Yury Usachev. NASA image. As Space Shuttle Discovery continues its pursuit of the International Space Station, crew members aboard Discovery and on the station itself are busy getting ready for the historic docking and crew exchange, scheduled for 12:34 a.m. EST Saturday. After a picture-perfect liftoff on Thursday, the STS-102 astronauts--Jim Wetherbee, Jim Kelly, Paul Richards and Andy Thomas--and Expedition Two crew members Yury Usachev, Jim Voss and Susan Helms, installed and checked out a targeting camera, extended the orbiter docking system's spring-loaded docking ring and unpacked rendezvous tools. Friday night, at a distance of about nine miles behind the station, Wetherbee will fire Discovery's engines allowing the shuttle to close in, using its rendezvous radar system to track distance and approach speed. Read more about the docking procedure and follow the action live on NASA TV and on NASA TV on the Web.

The Flight Day 2 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

09 March 2001 - Discovery will dock with the ISS tonight (early Saturday morning). NASA reports:

Discovery Chases Space Station
The Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module inside Discovery's payload bay. NASA image. Space Shuttle Discovery continues its pursuit of the International Space Station. All systems aboard the shuttle are ready for tonight's docking, scheduled for 11:34 p.m. CST (5:34 GMT Saturday).
Overnight, the STS-102 astronauts Jim Wetherbee, Jim Kelly, Paul Richards and Andy Thomas, and Expedition 2 crew members Yury Usachev, Jim Voss and Susan Helms installed and checked out a targeting camera, extended the orbiter docking system's spring-loaded docking ring and unpacked rendezvous tools. They are scheduled to begin an abbreviated sleep period at 9:42 a.m. CST (15:42 GMT) today. When the crew wakes up at 4:42 p.m. CST (22:42 GMT) to begin their final rendezvous activities, Discovery will be about 40 miles behind and slightly below the space station.

 

bullet

08 March 2001 - Evening Update - Discovery had a beautiful sunrise launch, heading for a mission to exchange Space Station crews and to deliver supplies via an Italian-built "moving van" known as Leonardo. NASA reports:

Discovery Chases Space Station
The six astronauts and one cosmonaut aboard Space Shuttle Discovery began their first full day in orbit Thursday at 6:42 p.m. CST (Friday at 00:42 GMT). Their day will be spent preparing for Discovery's docking with the International Space Station and checking out the robotic arm and the space suits that will be used in STS-102's two-scheduled space walks. The shuttle trailed the station by about 11,265 kilometers (7,000 miles) and was gaining on the orbital outpost at a rate of 1,126 kilometers per hour (700 miles per hour) at 7:30 p.m. CST Thursday (01:30 GMT Friday).
Discovery is slated to dock with the station Friday at 11:36 p.m. CST (Saturday at 05:36 GMT). STS-102 will be the eighth shuttle mission to visit the space station and will deliver the station's second resident crew and the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which was built by the Italian Space Agency.

The Flight Day 1 Crew Activity Report is now available in the NASA Gallery.


bullet

08 March - Afternoon Update - Discovery is heading for a rendezvous with Space Station Alpha. NASA reports:

Discovery In Orbit, Chasing the Station
STS-102 roars into orbit. NASA image.With this morning's successful launch behind them, Discovery's astronauts turned their attention to their chase of the International Space Station, performing several firings of the ship's jet thrusters over the next 40 hours to set up a docking with the outpost on Saturday at 12:36 a.m. EST. Over the ensuing week, the crew will perform two space walks outside the ISS as they help to outfit the recently installed U.S. research laboratory, Destiny. The Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, loaded with almost five tons of equipment, systems and science racks for transfer to Destiny, will be attached to the ISS early next week. The Expedition crews will exchange places on the ISS in a three-step fashion, beginning with Usachev and Gidzenko swapping roles as Station and Shuttle crewmembers early Saturday within hours after docking.
bullet

08 March - Morning Update - LIFTOFF! Discovery is in orbit, making a flawless early-morning liftoff. Thruster firings are in progress to tweak the spacecraft's orbit. NASA reports:

Discovery Lifts Off
STS-102 began today when Space Shuttle Discovery blasted off from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., at 5:42 a.m. CST (11:42 GMT). STS-102 is the eighth shuttle flight in the International Space Station Assembly Sequence. Onboard Discovery are seven crew members, which includes the station's Expedition Two crew. Discovery is also delivering the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which is carrying science racks and experiments for the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. While at the station, the STS-102 crew will conduct two space walks. Discovery is slated to dock with the station Friday at 11:36 p.m. CST (Saturday at 5:36 GMT).
Discovery Lifts Off Carrying New Station Crew
NASA photo of shuttle launchSpace Shuttle Discovery roared into the dawn sky at the Kennedy Space Center, FL, this morning on a mission to deliver the second long-term crew to the International Space Station. Three of the seven-member crew will change places with the Station's Expedition One crew--William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko--who will return to Earth aboard Discovery on March 20. They have been aboard the station since November.

Post-launch news conference at 7:45AM EST on NASA TV. Launch images here. Video here.


bullet

08 March 2001 - LAUNCH DAY - Are we going? Is it too cold? Let's light this candle! NASA reports:

Discovery, Crew Ready for Launch
NASA photo of the STS-102 crew.Thursday morning at 6:42 a.m. EST, Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled to liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-102 to the International Space Station. In addition to scientific equipment, the payload includes the three crew members of Expedition Two, who will relieve Bill Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko, who--as Expedition One--have lived aboard the Station since November. You can watch the launch live on NASA Television or NASA's webcast on your computer.

The crew boarded the spacecraft early this morning. Watch NASA TV for live coverage.

 

bullet

07 March 2001 - Liftoff tomorrow for Shuttle Discovery! NASA reports:

STS-102 Countdown Continues
The STS-102 launch countdown continues on schedule for liftoff at 5:42 a.m. CST (11:42 GMT) on Thursday, March 8. Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. CST (15:30 GMT), workers plan to retract the rotating service structure, which provides the access to the space shuttle as well as weather protection for the spacecraft. Fueling of the external tank is scheduled to begin at 8:45 p.m. CST Wednesday (2:45 GMT Thursday). The astronauts will arrive at the launch pad at 2:20 a.m. CST (8:20 GMT) Thursday morning to begin boarding Discovery.
Weather forecasters indicate a 70 percent chance that weather criteria for launch will be met. At launch time, the temperature at KSC will be near 44 degrees.

STS-102 pre-flight videos are now available in the NASA Gallery. Read CNN's interview with STS-102 Commander James Wetherebee here.


 

bullet

06 March 2001 - Discovery is packed up and ready to go! NASA reports:

Preparations Continue for Shuttle Launch Thursday
At the Kennedy Space Center, FL, preparations continue for the launch of STS-102. Space Shuttle Discovery is slated to lift off March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST to deliver the Expedition Two crew to the International Space Station and bring the Expedition One crew home. Along with exchanging a crew in orbit, the shuttle will carry the Leonardo Multipurpose Logistics Module. Built by the Italian Space Agency, Leonardo will serve as the station's moving van, allowing the shuttle to ferry experiments, supplies and cargo back and forth during missions. For this mission, it carries the Human Research Facility, the first research payload to be installed in the U.S. Laboratory, Destiny. The facility will open the door for research in expanding fields of biology, chemistry, physics and commercialization.
Marshall science command post readies for first experiments
Countdown began on Monday at Kennedy Space Center for Shuttle mission STS-102. Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled to launch at 5:42 a.m. CST Thursday. On board Discovery will be an Italian-built logistics carrier filled with laboratory experiments, including the Human Research Facility rack -- the first experiment facility to be delivered to the International Space Station. The Marshall Center was responsible for design and development of the three Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules and the Human Research Facility rack.

The only potential problem is the chilly weather that Florida is experiencing this week. The countdown continues...


 

bullet

05 March 2001 - The countdown has begun! Three of STS-102's crewmembers will be  "swapped out" for the returning Expedition One crew of Space Station Alpha. NASA reports:

Discovery to Deliver New Crew, Equipment Racks
NASA photo of Voss, Usachev, and Helms - ISS Expedition Two.When STS-102 roars in to orbit on Thursday, three of the crew members aboard Discovery know they will not return to Earth when the orbiter lands on March 20. The Expedition Two crew of the International Space Station, Yury Usachev, Susan Helms and James Voss, will have given up their seats to the crew members of Expedition One: William Shepherd, Yuri Gidzenko and Segei Krikalev; after a four-month stay aboard the station, it is time for them to come home. In addition to crew rotation duties, STS-102 will deliver six equipment racks for the U.S. laboratory inside the Italian-built Leonardo Multipurpose Logistics Module. STS-102 will be the eighth shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station. Launch is scheduled for 5:42 a.m. on March 8.

Helms will be the Station's first female resident.

 

bullet

03 March 2001 - The Space Shuttle is going up to the ISS next week. NASA reports:

Next Week's Shuttle Mission to Exchange Station Crews
NASA image of STS-102 crew.Preparations continue at the Kennedy Space Center, FL, for the launch of space shuttle Discovery on STS-102, scheduled for Thursday, March 8. The mission's main objective is to deliver the Expedition Two crew to the International Space Station and bring home the Expedition One Crew, whose three members have been aboard since November. The countdown toward launch will start Monday morning. Meanwhile, aboard the Station, Expedition One Commander Bill Shepherd, Pilot Yuri Gidzenko and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev continued unloading the Progress resupply ship that arrived at the station on February 28. In addition to its payload of fuel and supplies--which included office gear, food, clothing, spare parts and computers--some of the items delivered by the Progress are for the Expedition Two crew.

The Shuttle astronauts arrived at Kennedy Space Center Sunday night.

 

bullet

02 March 2001 - Shuttle Discovery will make the first crew exchange for the International Space Station, transporting Expedition Two to the orbiting complex and returning Expedition One. STS-102 will also deliver supplies and scientific equipment via the Italian-made Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. Here's the news from NASA:

STS-102 Preparations Continue
The STS-102 crew poses for a photo on the 215-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure. Standing, left to right, are Susan Helms, James Kelly, Andrew Thomas, Paul Richards, James Wetherbee, Yury Usachev and James Voss. Image courtesy of NASA. At Kennedy Space Center, Fla., preparations continue for the launch of STS-102. Space Shuttle Discovery is slated to lift off March 8 at 5:42 a.m. CST (11:42 GMT), and it will deliver the Expedition Two crew to the International Space Station. The flight crew is slated to arrive at Kennedy on Sunday. The launch countdown will start Monday at 9 a.m. CST (15:00 GMT).

Latest KSC Shuttle Status Report hereSpaceflight Now! and Houston Chronicle have ongoing coverage of this mission.

 

bullet

01 March 2001 - Space Station assembly and crew transfer is the mission of Shuttle Discovery. NASA reports:

Prelaunch Processing Continues
The STS-102 crew arrives at Kennedy Space Center. NASA photo. Prelaunch processing for Space Shuttle Discovery continues at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. STS-102 will deliver the International Space Station's second crew - Expedition Two - to the orbital outpost and return its first crew to Earth. Loading of propellant into the shuttle's external tank is slated to begin Tuesday. STS-102's primary payload, the Leonardo Multipurpose Logistics Module is scheduled to arrive at Launch Pad 39B on Friday and be installed into Discovery's payload bay on Feb. 26. STS-102 is slated to lift off March 8.

Liftoff is slated for Thursday, 08 Mar 2001 at 6:42AM EST, and docking with Space Station Alpha is due for late Friday night, 09 Mar 2001.

 

bullet

20 February 2001 - Welcome to our coverage of Shuttle Discovery's flight to the International Space Station! Here's the mission profile from NASA:

Space Shuttle Discovery to Deliver Expedition Two Crew to Station
Discovery rolls out to the launch pad. NASA photo. STS-102 will be the eighth shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station and will serve as a crew rotation flight. Space Shuttle Discovery will deliver the Expedition Two crew to the station and will return the Expedition One crew to Earth. The primary cargo for the mission is the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which contains six racks for the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module, which was delivered and installed onto the station during STS-98. The STS-102 crew will install Leonardo onto the International Space Station in order to unload its contents and then return it to Earth. Also, two space walks will be conducted to perform some assembly operations.

Rollout to Pad 39-B took place last week. Orbiter processing started in November 2000 with Discovery's return from its California landing on STS-92.

 

[Top]   [Space Home]   [Latest News]   [Missions]   [Gift Shop]   [Photos]   [Search]

           

STS-102 Links...

______

 

Play-By-Play:

Spaceflight Now!

 

Florida Today

 

______

 

SpaceRef Mission Guide

 

______

 

NASA STS-102 Photo Galleries:

Johnson Space Center

 

Kennedy Space Center

 

KSC Photo File

 

______

 

Shuttle Press Kit

 

______

 

Yahoo! News

 

______

 

Space.com

 

______

 

Live video on NASA TV! (Check schedule here).

Live mission audio

 

______

 

This page sponsored by:

Countdown
Creations

Shop at Countdown Creations!

Featuring Astronaut Flight Suits in all sizes!

 



Blast off to the ISS Journal!






















 

 
does leptiburn work | voyage vietnam